One of the biggest advantages of telehealth services is easy access to on-demand care. During a telemedicine consultation, a physician can inquire about symptoms, discuss treatment and determine whether a prescription is necessary. More importantly, for patients who don’t have a reliable means of transportation or who struggle with mobility challenges or disabilities that make traveling difficult, remote access can be a huge quality of life improvement. This is especially true for those living with chronic conditions for which frequent checkups are necessary. Telehealth services are also helping to fill healthcare gaps faced by rural communities across the United States — in areas where patients may have to drive for hours to get to the nearest hospital or specialist.
Used when both health providers are not available or not required at the same time. The provider’s voice or text dictation on the patient’s history, current affliction including pictures and/or video, radiology images, etc., are attached for diagnosis. This record is either emailed or placed on a server for the specialist’s access. The specialist then follows up with his diagnosis and treatment plan.
In the 2010s, integration of smart home telehealth technologies (wellness and health devices and software, Internet of Things) appears to be a growing phenomenon in the industry. Beyond that, healthcare organizations are increasingly adopting the use of self-tracking technologies, cloud-based technologies, and innovative data analytic approaches to accelerate the transformation of the healthcare system.
Teladoc, founded in 2002, was initially slow to catch on. But after it grew revenues by 100% in 2013 and with sales set to double again this year, investors have come running: The company just closed a $50 million Series F fundraising round, bringing its total funding to roughly $100 million, according to CEO Jason Gorevic, who joined the company in 2009. (Gorevic even had to turn away investors as the recent funding round was oversubscribed, he says.)
^ Parikh, Mili; Grosch, Maria C; Graham, Lara L; Hynan, Linda S; Weiner, Myron; Shore, James H; Cullum, C. Munro (2013). "Consumer Acceptability of Brief Videoconference-based Neuropsychological Assessment in Older Individuals with and without Cognitive Impairment". The Clinical Neuropsychologist. 27 (5): 808–17. doi:10.1080/13854046.2013.791723. PMC 3692573. PMID 23607729.
Healthcare systems, physician practices, and skilled nursing facilities are using telemedicine to provide care more efficiently. Technologies that comes integrated with telemedicine software like electronic medical records, AI diagnosis and medical streaming devices, can better assist providers in diagnosis and treatment. The latter allows providers to monitor patients in real-time and adjust treatment plans when necessary. Ultimately, this leads to better patient outcomes.
Type of telehealth. Medicare primarily only reimburses for live telemedicine, where the physician and patient are interacting in real-time through secure, videochat. This type of telemedicine visit is meant to substitute a face-to-face in-person visit. The only exception is in Hawaii and Alaska, where Medicare reimburses for store-and-forward telemedicine as well.
"Being able to tie [telehealth] to a larger strategic goal is critical to success," said Mr. Heller. UnityPoint Health aimed to provide the same quality of care for lower acuity visits at a reduced cost. The company looked at more than 1,000 visits from its self-insured health plan, assessing the additional value it generated from its employees using telehealth rather than taking off of work for medical care.
mHealth, also known as mobile health, is a form of telemedicine using wireless devices and cell phone technologies.  It is useful to think of mHealth as a tool--a medium--through which telemedicine can be practiced. mHealth is a particularly powerful development because it delivers clinical care through consumer-grade hardware and allows for greater patient and provider mobility. ATA has an array of Special Interest Groups with one dedicated to the practice and development of mHealth.
The technological advancement of wireless communication devices is a major development in telehealth.[19] This allows patients to self-monitor their health conditions and to not rely as much on health care professionals. Furthermore, patients are more willing to stay on their treatment plans as they are more invested and included in the process, decision-making is shared.[20][21] Technological advancement also means that health care professionals are able to use better technologies to treat patients for example in surgery. Technological developments in telehealth are essential to improve health care, especially the delivery of healthcare services, as resources are finite along with an ageing population that is living longer.[19][20][21]
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“Telemedicine is the natural evolution of healthcare in the digital world,” American Telemedicine Association. Telemedicine empowers the caregivers to remotely interact with their patients, which greatly improves both the efficiency and affordability of healthcare. Today patients, doctors and caregivers have learned to accept telemedicine (often called ‘telehealth’ or ‘connected health’) as one of many ways of delivering care.

While many conditions not on this list can be treated via telemedicine, these conditions are an especially good fit for telemedicine: Allergies and asthma, Chronic bronchitis, Conjunctivitis, UTIs, Low back pain, Otitis media, Rashes, Upper respiratory infections, Diabetes, Hypertension, Mental illness/behavioral health, Prevention and wellness services.
While the industry is still a long way from a standard set of established guidelines for telemedicine, the American Telemedicine Association has put together guidelines for a range of specialties based on a survey hundreds of research study. What are the clinical, technical, and administrative guidelines a medical practice needs to put in place when they’re adopting telemedicine? Beyond the minimal legal requirements of that state, what are telemedicine best practices?
VSee urges organizations interested in implementing telemedicine to find a telemedicine provider that offers HIPAA compliant software. This means that all data must be fully encrypted, have secure peer-to-peer network connections and have no storage of video. Telemedicine providers should also be comfortable signing a business associate agreement, which asserts that they will take responsibility in keeping patient information safe.
A pathologist, Ronald S. Weinstein, M.D., coined the term "telepathology" in 1986. In an editorial in a medical journal, Weinstein outlined the actions that would be needed to create remote pathology diagnostic services.[65] He, and his collaborators, published the first scientific paper on robotic telepathology.[66] Weinstein was also granted the first U.S. patents for robotic telepathology systems and telepathology diagnostic networks.[67] Weinstein is known to many as the "father of telepathology".[68] In Norway, Eide and Nordrum implemented the first sustainable clinical telepathology service in 1989.[69] This is still in operation, decades later. A number of clinical telepathology services have benefited many thousands of patients in North America, Europe, and Asia.
One of the biggest advantages of telehealth services is easy access to on-demand care. During a telemedicine consultation, a physician can inquire about symptoms, discuss treatment and determine whether a prescription is necessary. More importantly, for patients who don’t have a reliable means of transportation or who struggle with mobility challenges or disabilities that make traveling difficult, remote access can be a huge quality of life improvement. This is especially true for those living with chronic conditions for which frequent checkups are necessary. Telehealth services are also helping to fill healthcare gaps faced by rural communities across the United States — in areas where patients may have to drive for hours to get to the nearest hospital or specialist.

In many Walmart stores, retail consumers can walk up to a kiosk for a doctor consultation. The doctor is not physically present inside the store. Instead, the customer uses a touchscreen computer to type in their symptoms and enter a virtual waiting room. They are then connected by a video link to a doctor. This use-case is HIPAA-compliant because the video link is encrypted to protect patient health information.
These emerging models produce virtual communities of learning and practice that embrace all members of the healthcare team. They are the latest point on the telemedicine continuum that began with the point-to-point connection achieved by Einthoven's pioneering electrocardiogram. Building out the connection established under telemedicine into an ever-expanding knowledge-sharing network can create new potential to improve health and save lives.
One of the key advantages of telemedicine is the ability to provide healthcare to a patient, no matter the patient or provider’s location. However, since providers are licensed to practice in a specific state, they are only legally allowed to offer telemedicine services to patients in the same state. Currently, 49 state medical boards require physicians practicing telemedicine to be licensed in the state where the patient is located.
Telemedicine regulations also determine the telemedicine reimbursement rules followed by Medicaid and private payers in that state. With the explosion of new telemedicine companies and patient demand for virtual care, the number of telemedicine-related legislation currently on the table is at an all-time high. Most U.S. states have passed new telemedicine regulations recently, or have a proposed bill awaiting decision.
A native of rural Washington, Katie Gieseke has practiced medicine since 2009, and provided virtual care since 2015. She received her undergraduate degree in Nursing from the University of Portland and received her Doctorate of Nursing Practice and Family Nurse Practitioner certification from the University of Washington. Her nursing career ranges from experience in the emergency department to home health assessments. During her time in the emergency department, she became interested in improving the effectiveness, efficiency and continuity of the health care system. She has a strong interest in illness prevention and look forward to having the time to spend with patients providing education on maintaining wellness, disease prevention and motivating patients to take control of their health.
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