A native of rural Washington, Katie Gieseke has practiced medicine since 2009, and provided virtual care since 2015. She received her undergraduate degree in Nursing from the University of Portland and received her Doctorate of Nursing Practice and Family Nurse Practitioner certification from the University of Washington. Her nursing career ranges from experience in the emergency department to home health assessments. During her time in the emergency department, she became interested in improving the effectiveness, efficiency and continuity of the health care system. She has a strong interest in illness prevention and look forward to having the time to spend with patients providing education on maintaining wellness, disease prevention and motivating patients to take control of their health.

Inability to prescribe medications: Many states generally do not allow online prescribing (not to be confused with e-prescribing) without an established relationship between the physician and patient. A physical examination or evaluation may be required before a physician can write a prescription for a patient, but there are inconsistencies in state laws as to what constitutes a physical examination.
The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services defines telehealth as the use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support and promote long-distance clinical health care, patient and professional health-related education, public health and health administration. Technologies include videoconferencing, the internet, store-and-forward imaging, streaming media, and terrestrial and wireless communications.
Teladoc Health enjoys a killer advantage with its head start in telehealth. Around 40% of the largest companies in the world contract with Teladoc to provide virtual healthcare services to their employees. Over 35 of the biggest health plans in the U.S. have partnered with Teladoc. More than 290 hospitals and health systems have teamed up with the telehealth leader.
Telemedicine was originally created as a way to treat patients who were located in remote places, far away from local health facilities or in areas of with shortages of medical professionals. While telemedicine is still used today to address these problems, it’s increasingly becoming a tool for convenient medical care. Today’s connected patient wants to waste less time in the waiting room at the doctor, and get immediate care for minor but urgent conditions when they need it.

Kelly had the chance to test out the Doctor on Demand app, and it took her about ten minutes after downloading the app to start video chatting with a cool doc on her smartphone. Kelly’s session took about five minute total, and as soon as it was done, the doctor sent an antibiotic prescription straight to the pharmacy for her. 20 minutes later, she got a text saying it was ready to be picked up, and in under an hour, she had her prescription from Walgreens. For those who prioritize speed and low hassle over familiarity of their own doctor (or health center), or even those without insurance, this is a real win.
Online doctor consultation are rapidly gaining popularity these days as more health insurers offer telemedicine services to help cut costs. Studies have shown that virtual care may effectively used to treat common problems such as flu, acne, deer tick bites, sinus and urinary tract infections. Video doctor consultations can save patients a lot in time and convenience. 
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Dr. Mercado has practiced medicine since 2000, and provided virtual care since 2015. She earned her medical degree at the University of the Philippines in Manila. She completed her Family Medicine Residency at Akron General Medical Center in Ohio, where she was the chief resident during her final year of residency. She has spent the last six working in a primary care setting where she saw patients of all ages. Dr. Mercado believes communication is an integral part of a physician-patient interaction. During her free time, she enjoys reading, traveling, watching movies, volunteering, and spending time with her family.

Remote Patient Monitoring involves the reporting, collection, transmission, and evaluation of patient health data through electronic devices such as wearables, mobile devices, smartphone apps, and internet-enabled computers. RPM technologies remind patients to weigh themselves and transmit the measurements to their physicians. Wearables and other electronic monitoring devices are being used to collect and transfer vital sign data including blood pressures, cardiac stats, oxygen levels, and respiratory rates.


More widespread use and success of telehealth applications might spur the resolution of these reimbursement issues. CVS has been providing clinical services via telehealth since 2015. According to their study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, 95 percent of patients “were highly satisfied with the quality of care they received, the ease with which telehealth technology was integrated into the visit, and the timeliness and convenience of their care.” If CVS’s merger with Aetna is finalized, increased competition may motivate other payers to find ways to offer telehealth services and, by extension, levels of reimbursement. 
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Telehealth allows the patient to be monitored between physician office visits which can improve patient health. Telehealth also allows patients to access expertise which is not available in their local area. This remote patient monitoring ability enables patients to stay at home longer and helps avoid unnecessary hospital time. In the long-term, this could potentially result in less burdening of the healthcare system and consumption of resources.[1][8]
Store and Forward – This is a form of telehealth consultation which uses images from the patients to come up with the medical diagnosis. The different types of Store and Forward services include dermatology, radiology and wound care. It may also include transferring of patients’ clinical data like ECG and blood test results from the patients’ site to the hospital’s site.
While Doctor on Demand’s chief executive Adam Jackson says the start-up targets mainly retail customers who pay $40 for 10 minutes or so with a physician, it signed up Comcast , its first major corporate customer which will subsidize its employees video visits. Doctor on Demand has a network of more than 1,400 general practitioners, internists and pediatricians in 47 states. They diagnose simple ailments, such as pink eye, sore throat and allergies. Insurance doesn’t reimburse video consultations, but customers can use pre-tax dollars from their health savings account to pay.
It’s also important to note that many doctors using telemedicine will charge the patient a convenience fee, ranging from $35 – $125 per visit. This fee is direct from the patient and is on top of (or in place of) any reimbursement through a payer. While that means patients are paying out-of-pocket, many of eVisit’s clients have found patients don’t mind, and in fact are happy to pay the additional fee for the convenience.
One especially successful telemedicine project funded by the government was called the Space Technology Applied to Rural Papago Advanced Health Care (STARPAHC), and was a partnership between NASA and the Indian Health Services. The program funded remote medical services to Native Americans living on the Papago Reservation in Arizona and astronauts in space! Projects like STARPAHC drove research in medical engineering, and helped expand advancements in telemedicine. The next few decades saw continued innovations in telemedicine and wider research at universities, medical centers and research companies.
The study of 15 of the state’s hospitals using the platform to treat some 500,000 patients saw a 25 percent reduction in a hospital’s staffing costs, while the hospitals saw a 20 percent increase in admissions – patients who would have been transferred to UMMC for ultimately non-serious issues, depriving the local hospital of revenues and taxing UMMC’s resources.
Teledermatology allows dermatology consultations over a distance using audio, visual and data communication, and has been found to improve efficiency.[70] Applications comprise health care management such as diagnoses, consultation and treatment as well as (continuing medical) education.[71][72][73] The dermatologists Perednia and Brown were the first to coin the term "teledermatology" in 1995. In a scientific publication, they described the value of a teledermatologic service in a rural area underserved by dermatologists.[74]
Visit Teladoc and set up an account using the information provided on your GuideStone/Highmark BCBS ID card. You'll also complete a medical history so that it's easy for the Teladoc physician to access when providing treatment. Or you can set up your account and provide your medical history by calling 1-800-TELADOC (1-800-835-2362). If they ask for your employer's name, be sure to tell them your coverage is provided through GuideStone/Highmark BCBS and provide the identification information from your ID card. Learn more about How to Register.
The range and use of telehealth services have expanded over the past decades, along with the role of technology in improving and coordinating care. Traditional models of telehealth involve care delivered to a patient at an originating (or spoke) site from a specialist working at a distant (or hub) site. A telehealth network consists of a series of originating sites receiving services from a collaborating distant site.
Disease Management: A coordinated and continuous health process for the purposes of managing and improving the health status of a specifically defined population of patients over the complete course of the disease (e.g., DM, CHF). The targeted patient populations are high-cost, high-risk patients that have chronic conditions that require appropriate care in order to be maintained properly.
Once the need for a Telehealth service is established, delivery can come within four distinct domains. They are live video (synchronous), store-and-forward (asynchronous), remote patient monitoring, and mobile health. Live video involves a real-time two-way interaction, such as patient/caregiver-provider or provider-provider, over a digital (i.e. broadband) connection. This often is used to substitute a face to face meeting such as consults, and saves time and cost in travel. Store-and-forward is when data is collected, recorded, and then sent on to a provider.[1][2][10] For example, a patient's' digital health history file including x-rays and notes, being securely transmitted electronically to evaluate the current case. Remote patient monitoring includes patients' medical and health data being collected and transferred to a provider elsewhere who can continue to monitor the data and any changes that may occur. This may best suit cases that require ongoing care such as rehabilitation, chronic care, or elderly clients trying to stay in the community in their own homes as opposed to a care facility. Mobile health includes any health information, such as education, monitoring and care, that is present on and supported by mobile communication devices such as cell phones or tablet computers. This might include an application, or text messaging services like appointment reminders or public health warning systems.[10]
Teladoc is the oldest and largest telemedicine company in United States. It was launched in 2002 in Dallas, Texas by Dr. Byron Brooks, a former NASA flight surgeon, and serial entrepreneur Michael Gorton.[7] Teladoc launched nationally in 2005 at the Consumer Directed Health Care Conference, in Chicago, Illinois.[8] By the end of 2007, it had attracted about 1 million members, including large employers who provided it to their employees as a health benefit. Jason Gorevic was named CEO in 2009 and currently holds the role and sits on the company's board of directors.[9]
Equipping nursing homes and hospital rooms this way would enable a variety of practitioners to provide bedside care more conveniently—for the patient and the provider. Patients wouldn't have to be transported, and practitioners could see more patients without disruption. In addition, the primary care provider, family, and friends located elsewhere could link into the video consultations, enhancing communication between all parties involved in the patient's care.

I'm a former scientist, using words and an audio recorder as my new research tools to untangle the health and food issues that matter most to consumers. I live in Brooklyn, N.Y., where I cook as much as possible. You can find me in the grocery aisle scrutinizing the fine print of every food item I put into my cart. Follow me on Twitter @juliacalderone.
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