Dr. Miller has practiced medicine since 1988, and provided virtual care since 2015. She completed her medical degree at the Sackler School of Medicine in Tel Aviv then returned to New York to complete her family medicine residency. She later completed her preventive medicine residency at the University of Washington, earning her MPH. Since 1992, she has worked in family medicine and public health in Washington. She continues to provide care at a local clinic and appreciates the opportunity to help her patients make effective healthcare choices. Dr. Miller received Top Docs Recognition for four years in Seattle Met Magazine. Away from work, she enjoys time with her family, traveling, gardening and being outdoors.


The U.S. spends over $2.9 trillion on healthcare every year, more than any other developed nation. On top of that, an estimated $200 billion of those costs are avoidable, unnecessary spending. Telemedicine has the power to cut our healthcare spending by reducing problems like medication non-adherence and unnecessary ER visits, and making typical doctor visits more efficient.
Remote Patient Monitoring involves the reporting, collection, transmission, and evaluation of patient health data through electronic devices such as wearables, mobile devices, smartphone apps, and internet-enabled computers. RPM technologies remind patients to weigh themselves and transmit the measurements to their physicians. Wearables and other electronic monitoring devices are being used to collect and transfer vital sign data including blood pressures, cardiac stats, oxygen levels, and respiratory rates.
This term has a narrower scope than that of telehealth. It refers more specifically to education over a distance and the provision of health care services through the use of telecommunications technology. Telemedicine refers to the use of information technologies and electronic communications to provide remote clinical services to patients. The digital transmission of medical imaging, remote medical diagnosis and evaluations, and video consultations with specialists are all examples of telemedicine.
ISDN Basic Rate Interface (BRI): A type of ISDN interface that provides 128K of bandwith tht is used for videoconferencing as well as simultaneous data and voice services. A multiplexer can be used to link together multiple BRI lines in order for higher bandwidth levels to be achieved. For example, one popular option among telehealth networks is combining 3 BRI lines in order for video-conferencing to be provided with 384K of bandwidth. BRI services are unavailable in some rural areas. Before videoconferencing equipment is order for using this kind of service, one needs to check with their telecommunications provider to see if BRI services are available.

Patients often look for a quick and inexpensive second opinion from a specialist, after diagnosis of a medical condition. Telemedicine has stepped up, by providing solutions in this aspect as well. Companies and traditional healthcare services such as Partners Healthcare, 2nd.MD, DoctorSpring, and Cleaveland Clinic are providing quick and efficient second opinions using telehealth.


Wyoming Medicaid conducted a study measuring engagement and post-birth outcomes for patients  who used a mobile health app called, “Due Date Plus.” Use of the app, which allowed women to record pregnancy milestones, access medical services, and find symptom-related information was associated with increased compliance with prenatal care and decreased occurrence of babies born with low birth weights.

Teledermatology allows dermatology consultations over a distance using audio, visual and data communication, and has been found to improve efficiency.[70] Applications comprise health care management such as diagnoses, consultation and treatment as well as (continuing medical) education.[71][72][73] The dermatologists Perednia and Brown were the first to coin the term "teledermatology" in 1995. In a scientific publication, they described the value of a teledermatologic service in a rural area underserved by dermatologists.[74]
Store and Forward – This is a form of telehealth consultation which uses images from the patients to come up with the medical diagnosis. The different types of Store and Forward services include dermatology, radiology and wound care. It may also include transferring of patients’ clinical data like ECG and blood test results from the patients’ site to the hospital’s site.

Originally, health professionals developed this technology to reach remote patients living in the rural areas. But with time, medical staff and the U.S. government saw the big picture – the potential to reach urban populations with healthcare shortages, and to respond to medical emergencies by sharing medical consults and patient health records without delay. In the 1960s, heavy investments from the U.S. Government, including the Public Health Department, NASA, Department of Defense, and the Health and Human Sciences Department drove research and innovation in telemedicine. Sending cardiac rhythms during emergencies started at about this time. For instance, in Miami, the university medical center worked together with the fire rescue department by sending electro-cardiac rhythm signals over the voice radio channels from the rescue sites.

In-office visits and overnight stays at healthcare facilities can be difficult for individuals in poor health. Telehealth services reduce hospital readmission rates by enabling doctors to monitor patients outside the office. Because of this, many hospitals have already started to include some form of remote monitoring as part of their post-discharge plans. By equipping patients with wearable devices or other wireless technologies, clinicians can monitor vital signs and symptoms and adjust care as needed without an in-office visit. Alignment Healthcare, for example, developed a program to remotely monitor chronically ill and recently discharged patients and reduce 30-day readmission rates. Enrollees were given a package of Bluetooth-enabled monitoring equipment, including a Samsung tablet, blood pressure cuff, pulse oximeter and scale.

“Although many definitions are similar, there are nuanced differences that reflect each organization's legislative intent and the population they serve,” the study concluded. “These definitions affect how telemedicine has been or is being applied across the healthcare landscape, reflecting the U.S. government's widespread and influential role in healthcare access and service delivery. The evidence base suggests that a common nomenclature for defining telemedicine may benefit efforts to advance the use of this technology to address the changing nature of healthcare and new demands for services expected as a result of health reform.”
The rise of the internet age brought with it profound changes for the practice of telemedicine. The proliferation of smart devices, capable of high-quality video transmission, opened up the possibility of delivering remote healthcare to patients in their homes, workplaces or assisted living facilities as an alternative to in-person visits for both primary and specialty care.
Medical City Virtual Care allows patients to see and talk to licensed, board-certified physicians, nurse practitioners or physician assistants from their mobile device or computer through a secure internet video connection. These healthcare professionals can diagnose, treat and prescribe non-narcotic medication for a wide variety of adult and pediatric non-emergency medical conditions, including:
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