Healthcare providers currently earn their medical licenses for a specific state. This lets them practice medicine legally in that state, and only that state. This presents a problem for telemedicine, as the entire goal is to break down geographical barriers between a patient and provider. According to medical licensing regulations, a specialist based in Colorado would not be legally allowed to treat a patient in New Mexico.

Telehealth, the use of electronic communication to remotely provide health care information and services, is gaining more and more attention as providers, patients, and payers all seek more effective and cost-efficient ways to deliver care. Physical therapy is no exception, and while those services have developed mostly in rural areas to accommodate the long distances between patients and providers, telehealth in physical therapy is being considered in other geographic and clinical settings.

Patients and their families often want continuous monitoring and care. Traditional health insurance providers are partnering with telehealth companies, to address those concerns. Anthem is working with American Well, Cigna is working with MDLive, Bupa is working with Babylon Health and Aflac is working with MeMD to deliver benefits of telehealth to it’s existing customers. Health insurance providers such as Oscar Health is redefining health-insurance by building the whole customer experience around its own telehealth services.
Although, traditional medicine relies on in-person care, the need and want for remote care has existed from the Roman and pre-Hippocratic periods in antiquity. The elderly and infirm who could not visit temples for medical care sent representatives to convey information on symptoms and bring home a diagnosis as well as treatment.[5] In Africa, villagers would use smoke signals to warn neighbouring villages of disease outbreak.[6] The beginnings of telehealth have existed through primitive forms of communication and technology.[5]
Additionally, Medicare will only pay for telemedicine services when the patient is located in a Health Professional Shortage Area and receives care from an eligible provider. The medical service itself also has to fall under one of thesecovered CPT/HCPCS codes. When all these conditions are met, Medicare pays for 80% of the physician fee (other 20% is paid by the patient) and will additionally pay a facility fee to the originating site.
However, coverage, payment and other policy issues prevent full use of telehealth, remote patient monitoring and similar technologies. Medicare policy is particularly challenging, as it limits the geographic and practice settings where beneficiaries may receive services, as well as the types of services that may be provided via telehealth and the types of technology that may be used. Access to broadband services and state-level policy issues, such as licensure, also limit the ability to use telehealth.
All the guidelines and restrictions we’ve listed above are for billing telemedicine through traditional Medicare. Medicare Advantage plans under a commercial payer have complete flexibility to cover telemedicine however they want! This means, Advantage plans may cover telemedicine for your patient and not have any of those restrictions on what qualifies as an eligible originating site. Call the payer and ask what they’ll cover and what their telemedicine guidelines are.
The U.S. spends over $2.9 trillion on healthcare every year, more than any other developed nation. On top of that, an estimated $200 billion of those costs are avoidable, unnecessary spending. Telemedicine has the power to cut our healthcare spending by reducing problems like medication non-adherence and unnecessary ER visits, and making typical doctor visits more efficient.
In the last decade, rapid advances in medicine and technology has resulted in the use of new terms. Policymakers, healthcare systems, advocacy groups, and vendors may unknowingly use terms incorrectly when discussing medicine and technology. This is especially true when it comes to the terms, telemedicine and telehealth. Although the words are often used interchangeably, there is certainly a difference between the two.
A telemedicine vendor should have no reservations in signing a Business Associate Agreement. Those that do sign one are confident in their ability to securely store patient information. VSee is currently the only company that offers a HIPAA Messenger App for organizations to try for free. They are confident that their telemedicine solutions can protect pertinent patient information.
Telemedicine regulations also determine the telemedicine reimbursement rules followed by Medicaid and private payers in that state. With the explosion of new telemedicine companies and patient demand for virtual care, the number of telemedicine-related legislation currently on the table is at an all-time high. Most U.S. states have passed new telemedicine regulations recently, or have a proposed bill awaiting decision.
While telemedicine is the older of the two phrases, telehealth is rapidly gaining acceptance, in large part because of the evolution of the healthcare landscape. The rise of consumer-directed healthcare and the shift from fee-based care to quality- and outcomes-based care has put more of an emphasis on health and wellness and care management. And in that atmosphere, telehealth fits the mold.
There are many new medical tech terms being used today that the average patient may not be familiar with. For example, a common misunderstanding is that the terms telemedicine, telecare, and telehealth are interchangeable. The truth is that each of these terms refers to a different way of administering health care via existing technologies or a different area of medical technology. To clarify the subtle differences between these three terms, we have provided a detailed definition of each.
In-person patient-doctor visits are clearly valuable and necessary in many circumstances. Telemedicine is best used to supplement these visits – to do simple check-ins with patients and make sure everything is going well. For minor acute conditions (like infections), an in-person visit with an established patient is often not needed. In those cases, telemedicine can save the patient, the doctor, and the healthcare system time and money.
This isn't to say that you should jump right in and begin providing services via telehealth. You'll first need to consider federal and state legislation and regulations that govern your practice, risk management implications, billing and coding issues, and hardware/software requirements. The resources below aren't meant to give you detailed instructions on developing and using telehealth in your practice, but they identify areas most important for you to investigate and consider.
This term has a narrower scope than that of telehealth. It refers more specifically to education over a distance and the provision of health care services through the use of telecommunications technology. Telemedicine refers to the use of information technologies and electronic communications to provide remote clinical services to patients. The digital transmission of medical imaging, remote medical diagnosis and evaluations, and video consultations with specialists are all examples of telemedicine.
Hypertension disorder affects approximately one third of the adult population in the United States. The cause usually stems from improper nutrition, obesity, cigarette smoke, alcohol abuse, high sodium intake, and a lack of regular physical activity. While making life changes can eventually lower blood pressure to a healthy level once more, it is sometimes necessary to treat the issue with a prescription medication.
Teleneuropsychology (Cullum et al., 2014) is the use of telehealth/videoconference technology for the remote administration of neuropsychological tests. Neuropsychological tests are used to evaluate the cognitive status of individuals with known or suspected brain disorders and provide a profile of cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Through a series of studies, there is growing support in the literature showing that remote videoconference-based administration of many standard neuropsychological tests results in test findings that are similar to traditional in-person evaluations, thereby establishing the basis for the reliability and validity of teleneuropsychological assessment.[30][31][32][32][33][34][35]

An example of these limitations include the current American reimbursement infrastructure, where Medicare will reimburse for telehealth services only when a patient is living in an area where specialists are in shortage, or in particular rural counties. The area is defined by whether it is a medical facility as opposed to a patient's' home. The site that the practitioner is in, however, is unrestricted. Medicare will only reimburse live video (synchronous) type services, not store-and-forward, mhealth or remote patient monitoring (if it does not involve live-video). Some insurers currently will reimburse telehealth, but not all yet. So providers and patients must go to the extra effort of finding the correct insurers before continuing. Again in America, states generally tend to require that clinicians are licensed to practice in the surgery' state, therefore they can only provide their service if licensed in an area that they do not live in themselves.[1]


Likely a favorite among patients aging in place, telemedicine permits providers to monitor their patients in their own homes. Using patient portals, a physician can gather and share information with their patient. In addition, medical devices can send vital signs and more to providers so they can make adjustments to care as needed. VSee offers their clients the following telemedicine solutions:

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When a patient is in the hospital and he is placed under general observation after a surgery or other medical procedure, the hospital is usually losing a valuable bed and the patient would rather not be there as well. Home health allows the remote observation and care of a patient. Home health equipment consists of vital signs capture, video conferencing capabilities, and patient stats can be reviewed and alarms can be set from the hospital nurse’s station, depending on the specific home health device.
Online doctors are becoming a real thing across America, not just for those who are tech savvy, but for anyone. Although telemedicine was introduced in the United States in the 1960s, it didn’t become popular for the everyday man or women until this last decade. In the past, missing a prescription refill with your family doctor right before the weekend would mean going until Monday before you could even try to schedule an appointment. And even then, it might be days or weeks before you could get in to see the physician.

Universal Service Administrative Company: Abbreviated as USAC, the Universal Service Administrative Company is responsible for administering USFs or Universal Service Funds to allow easy access to telecommunication services across the country. The Rural Health Care Division which is under USAC as well manages discount programs for telecommunications health care.
Symptoms occur due to a swelling of the breathing tubes, which makes it difficult for air to pass into the lungs. For those who smoke cigarettes, suffer from obesity, or live with allergies, these symptoms are more severe. By speaking with a U.S. doctor through your consultation, you can receive a prescription for the proper medication to treat asthma. To treat your symptoms,click herefor more information! .
The laws regarding reimbursements change regularly as more service providers incorporate telehealth technology into their practices. Reimbursement procedures can vary by state, practice, insurer, and service. [3] Care providers need to understand several facts, regulations, and laws to navigate Medicare telehealth reimbursements. They must first scrutinize whether the distance between the facility (the originating site) and the patient is far enough to qualify as a distant site. The location must also qualify as a Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) per Medicare guidelines. Additionally, the originating site must fall under Medicare’s classification as a legally authorized private practice, hospital, or critical access hospital (CAH). For instance, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ranks the Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center as a top facility in need of physician services based on these criteria. Care providers must also use proper insurance coding to be reimbursed for hosting services that use telehealth technologies. For now, collecting reimbursements for telehealth services remains simpler for practitioners who limit the scope to which they apply the technology.
Limitations of Online Doctor/Medical Consultations and Online Prescriptions, QuickRxRefills Cannot and Will NOT Prescribe, Dispense, or Resell any and all medications Narcotics/Controlled Substances (this policy is fully enforced by theDrug Enforcement Administration (DEA)) for Anti-depressants, Pain, Anxiety, Weightloss, Sleep, ADHD/ADD, Anabolic Steroids, Testosterone Replacement Therapy and any and all Medications that contain GabaPentin or Pseudroephedrine including non-controlled substances or any medications that are considered controversial, Off Labeled (Growth Hormone aka HGH) or recalled in nature such (i.e. Retin-A, Accutane). Furthermore, QuickRxRefills is not a substitute for an office based physician in your location nor is it a substitute for Emergency Medical Care or 911. If you do experience a "true" medical emergency your are encouraged to pick up the phone and dial 911 as soon as possible.
Their distinguishing feature is that they expand the point-to-point connection that is the foundation of telemedicine. Instead of connecting one person to one person for a single interaction, they connect many to many, on an ongoing basis. To address system challenges like access, quality and dissemination of best practices, we need these more powerful linkages.
Telepharmacy is the delivery of pharmaceutical care via telecommunications to patients in locations where they may not have direct contact with a pharmacist. It is an instance of the wider phenomenon of telemedicine, as implemented in the field of pharmacy. Telepharmacy services include drug therapy monitoring, patient counseling, prior authorization and refill authorization for prescription drugs, and monitoring of formulary compliance with the aid of teleconferencing or videoconferencing. Remote dispensing of medications by automated packaging and labeling systems can also be thought of as an instance of telepharmacy. Telepharmacy services can be delivered at retail pharmacy sites or through hospitals, nursing homes, or other medical care facilities.
Likely one of the most popular specialities for telemedicine, mental health practices can increase revenue, streamline patient flow, and provide counselling sessions from anywhere. With telemedicine, patients in rural areas can now access mobile and web apps to speak with their therapist. In addition, cancellations and no-shows are less likely to occur. Mental health practices that implement telemedicine can also see more patients and still provide a high level of patient care. This leads to increased profitability and effective time management.
Thanks to telemedicine programs, hospitals, clinics and all other health facilities can ensure that patients receive the best care possible when that care is in their hometown or even hundred of miles away. So what is telehealth’s role in this? It can play a major role in addressing some of the upcoming challenges for healthcare in the United States. For instance, the population growth from 2008-2030 is set at 20%, that is 363 million people, which is predicted to bring about a shortage of healthcare professionals and the lack of specialists and medical facilities in rural areas. Additionally, there is an expected increase in chronic diseases such as diabetes, congestive heart failure, and obstructive pulmonary disease. Statistics indicates that almost 5 million patients are admitted to the intensive care unit that accounts for 20% of the hospital’s operating budgets. Telemedicine can reduce the impact of such challenges by connecting the right people with the correct resources and expertise in real-time.
Internet Protocol (IP): The protocol for sending data from one computer over the Internet to another. Every computer that is on the Internet has one address at least that identifies it uniquely from all of the other computers that are on the Internet. Internet Protocol is a connectionless form of protocol, meaning there isn’t a connection that is established between the two points that are communicating with one another. A videoconferencing system’s IP address is its telephone number.
From the late 1800s to the early 1900s the early foundations of wireless communication were laid down.[5] Radios provided an easier and near instantaneous form of communication. The use of radio to deliver healthcare became accepted for remote areas.[5][8] The Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia is an example of the early adoption of radios in telehealth.[6]
Telehealth and Patient Engagement: With telehealth technologies, patients are taking more control of their well-being. Educational videos, health management apps for mobile devices, and online health learning and support communities empower patients to manage chronic conditions, lose weight, increase physical activity levels, and gain emotional support. Diabetes patients are benefiting from carbohydrate tracking apps and are using glucose monitoring devices to document and report their blood sugar measurements. Other patients are interacting with their providers and scheduling appointments through secure online communication portals. Additionally, they are accessing health education content via smartphones and computers to add to their self-care toolboxes. They are also using wearables and monitoring systems to gain knowledge about their sleep patterns, vital signs, and activity levels.
Telehealth is sometimes discussed interchangeably with telemedicine. The Health Resources and Services Administration distinguishes telehealth from telemedicine in its scope. According to them, telemedicine only describes remote clinical services; such as diagnosis and monitoring, while telehealth includes preventative, promotive and curative care delivery.[1] This includes the above-mentioned non-clinical applications like administration and provider education which make telehealth the preferred modern terminology.[2]
Type of telehealth. Medicare primarily only reimburses for live telemedicine, where the physician and patient are interacting in real-time through secure, videochat. This type of telemedicine visit is meant to substitute a face-to-face in-person visit. The only exception is in Hawaii and Alaska, where Medicare reimburses for store-and-forward telemedicine as well.

As telehealth continues to replace traditional health care, it is going to inherit some of its challenges. These include increased cost of care due to multiple vendors, complex care pathways, and government policies. However, the question that remains to be answered is will this advanced technology that we call telehealth, be able to redefine the quality, equity and affordability of healthcare throughout the world.


This expectation for more convenient care, combined with the unavailability of many overburdened medical professionals (especially primary care providers) have led to the rise of telemedicine companies. Many offer patients 24/7 access to medical care with an on-call doctor contracted by that company. Others offer hospitals and larger health centers access to extra clinical staff and specialists, for outsourcing of special cases (common model among teleradiology companies). Still others provide a telemedicine platform for physicians to use to offer virtual visits with their own patients. Increasingly, telemedicine is becoming a way to give medical practices an edge in a competitive healthcare landscape where it’s difficult to stay independent or maintain a healthy bottom line.
Doctor on Demand is currently available for patients in 15 states, including large states like California, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and Texas. The company has more than 1,000 doctors available for video consultants one or two days a week, according to Bloomberg Businessweek. The company trains physicians on how to use the service, and covers other logistics like patient questionnaires and malpractice insurance.

Several physicians and patients are finding it difficult to adapt to telemedicine, especially older adults. Physicians are very concerned about patient mismanagement. While advances in medicine have made it more efficient to use technology, there are times when system outages occur. There is also the potential for error as technology cannot always capture what the human touch can.


Significant hurdles for more wide-spread telehealth adoption are the limits on reimbursement and the inconsistent payer landscape. In a KLAS-CHIME study from October of last year, over 50 percent of respondents from 104 health care organizations indicated that limits on reimbursement constrict their ability to expand telehealth services for patients. Medicare and Medicaid offer disparate degrees of flexibility while private payers also represent varying levels of funding.
States may submit a coverage SPA to better describe the telemedicine services they choose to cover, such as which providers/practitioners are; where it is provided; how it is provided, etc. In this case, and in order to avoid unnecessary SPA submissions, it is recommended that a brief description of the framework of telemedicine be placed in an introductory section of the State Plan and then a reference made to telemedicine coverage in the applicable benefit sections of the State Plan. For example, in the physician section it might say that dermatology services can be delivered via telemedicine provided all state requirements related to telemedicine as described in the state plan are otherwise met.
We are currently partnered with over 145 facilities across 25 states and have over 12,000 patient encounters annually. Average response time for calls is three minutes, and we use redundant staffing procedures to ensure a medical specialist will always be available to assist your patients. By working together, we can drastically improve patient outcomes and your community’s access to specialty medical services.
Nursing Call Center – This is a centralized office where nurses are the ones who are working. The nurses are responsible for answering telephone calls from patients. They should also make responses to faxes, electronic mails and letters from patients. Nursing call centers may also provide the callers with the basic information regarding their health, but they should not disclose the diagnosis made by the doctors on their conditions. They should not prescribe medications as well. They may just provide basic instructions when patients are having health complaints.
In the United States, the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research's (NIDRR)[38] supports research and the development of telerehabilitation. NIDRR's grantees include the "Rehabilitation Engineering and Research Center" (RERC) at the University of Pittsburgh, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the State University of New York at Buffalo, and the National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington DC. Other federal funders of research are the Veterans Health Administration, the Health Services Research Administration in the US Department of Health and Human Services, and the Department of Defense.[39] Outside the United States, excellent research is conducted in Australia and Europe.
Ravyn Ramos has practiced medicine since 2009 and provided virtual care since 2014. She received her Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine degree from Bastyr University in 2004, and her Master of Nursing from Seattle University in 2007. In addition to her work in telemedicine, she serves as clinical faculty in Walden University's distance learning program, as well as practicing as a Family Nurse Practitioner in several local medical centers. In her spare time, she enjoys Bikram yoga, baking bread, traveling and watching the Sounders.
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