Telehealth is defined as the use of electronic information and telecommunication technologies to support and promote long-distance clinical health care, patient and professional health-related education, public health and health administration. Technologies include video conferencing, the internet, store-and-forward imaging, streaming media, and terrestrial and wireless communications.
Bluetooth Wireless: Bluetooth refers to an industrial specification that applies to wireless area networks. Bluetooth technology offers a way of connecting and exchanging information between devices, including laptops, mobile phones, PCs, video game consoles, digital cameras and printers over a globally unlicensed and secure short-range radio frequency. The Bluetooth Special Interest Groups has developed and licensed the Bluetooth specifications.
Not all state and federal agencies define telehealth in exactly the same terms, but most are fairly consistent with the federal Health Resources and Services Administration, which defines telehealth this way, “The use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support long-distance clinical health care, patient and professional health-related education, public health and health administration.”
The concept of telemedicine started with the birth of telecommunications technology, the means of sending information over a distance in the form of electromagnetic signals. Early forms of telecommunications technology included the telegraph, radio, and telephone. In the late 19th century, the radio and telephone were just starting to emerge as viable communication technologies. Alexander Graham Bell patented the telephone in 1876 and Heinrich Rudolf Hertz performed the first radio transmission in 1887.
One of the key advantages of telemedicine is the ability to provide healthcare to a patient, no matter the patient or provider’s location. However, since providers are licensed to practice in a specific state, they are only legally allowed to offer telemedicine services to patients in the same state. Currently, 49 state medical boards require physicians practicing telemedicine to be licensed in the state where the patient is located.

Another reason you might find yourself in need of Express Med Refills is during your own vacation, business trip, or weekend getaway. There’s nothing worse than waking up to realize you’ve left your medication at home on the kitchen counter. For patients who require medicine everyday this is a nightmare, and one that should be rectified as soon as possible. Through our quick and secure services, you can speak to a doctor and receive the help you need within 20 minutes to 2-hours.

Although, traditional medicine relies on in-person care, the need and want for remote care has existed from the Roman and pre-Hippocratic periods in antiquity. The elderly and infirm who could not visit temples for medical care sent representatives to convey information on symptoms and bring home a diagnosis as well as treatment.[5] In Africa, villagers would use smoke signals to warn neighbouring villages of disease outbreak.[6] The beginnings of telehealth have existed through primitive forms of communication and technology.[5]
Patients and their families often want continuous monitoring and care. Traditional health insurance providers are partnering with telehealth companies, to address those concerns. Anthem is working with American Well, Cigna is working with MDLive, Bupa is working with Babylon Health and Aflac is working with MeMD to deliver benefits of telehealth to it’s existing customers. Health insurance providers such as Oscar Health is redefining health-insurance by building the whole customer experience around its own telehealth services.

With telemedicine, patients can connect with their dermatologist using a smartphone, tablet, or computer. Using high definition images and video, dermatologists can examine a patient suffering from psoriasis, eczema, bedsores, and more. This is extremely convenient for those patients that are housebound. Using telemedicine solutions, dermatologists can diagnose and treat skin care conditions effectively and efficiently. In addition, it not only saves a patient from travelling to a clinic but it also helps them maintain their dignity.
Telehealth involves the distribution of health-related services and information via electronic information and telecommunication technologies.[1] It allows long distance patient/clinician contact and care, advice, reminders, education, intervention, monitoring and remote admissions.[2] As well as provider distance-learning; meetings, supervision, and presentations between practitioners; online information and health data management and healthcare system integration.[3] Telehealth could include two clinicians discussing a case over video conference; a robotic surgery occurring through remote access; physical therapy done via digital monitoring instruments, live feed and application combinations; tests being forwarded between facilities for interpretation by a higher specialist; home monitoring through continuous sending of patient health data; client to practitioner online conference; or even videophone interpretation during a consult.[1][2][3]

Store-and-forward is the oldest form of telehealth technology. It refers to the transmission of images or information from one provider to another. For example, if your doctor sends digital images of an x-ray to a radiologist for analysis, they are leveraging store-and-forward telehealth technology. This is one of the most common uses, but images and information of any type can be transmitted in this matter. One thing we should point out, however, is that store-and-forward telehealth is not always covered by state telemedicine reimbursement laws, even in states that require parity for real-time communication.
But getting doctors to jump on board is easier said than done, and takes time. Many are afraid of liability, as it's possible to miss something during a remote visit. And for years, it wasn't clear whether they would get paid as much as an in-person visit. Reimbursement questions are still getting resolved across different states, but most of the commercial and government plans are on board with the idea of telemedicine -- at least in specific circumstances.
It has been around for decades, but in recent years private insurers, employers, and government programs have expanded their coverage. By 2016 at least half of U.S. healthcare institutions and hospitals were using some form of telehealth. And last September the Senate passed a bill that will expand Medicare coverage for telehealth services, if it’s signed into law.
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