Telehealth requires a strong, reliable broadband connection. The broadband signal transmission infrastructure includes wires, cables, microwaves and optic fibre, which must be maintained for the provision of telehealth services. The better the connection (bandwidth quality), the more data can be sent and received. Historically this has priced providers or patients out of the service, but as the infrastructure improves and becomes more accessible, telehealth usage can grow.[1][2]
States may submit a coverage SPA to better describe the telemedicine services they choose to cover, such as which providers/practitioners are; where it is provided; how it is provided, etc. In this case, and in order to avoid unnecessary SPA submissions, it is recommended that a brief description of the framework of telemedicine be placed in an introductory section of the State Plan and then a reference made to telemedicine coverage in the applicable benefit sections of the State Plan. For example, in the physician section it might say that dermatology services can be delivered via telemedicine provided all state requirements related to telemedicine as described in the state plan are otherwise met.
Remote monitoring, also known as self-monitoring or testing, enables medical professionals to monitor a patient remotely using various technological devices. This method is primarily used for managing chronic diseases or specific conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes mellitus, or asthma. These services can provide comparable health outcomes to traditional in-person patient encounters, supply greater satisfaction to patients, and may be cost-effective.[16] Examples include home-based nocturnal dialysis[17] and improved joint management.[18]
But for growth investors, Teladoc looks like a great pick. Telehealth is still in its early stages with a tremendous opportunity for growth. Teladoc Health is the top player in the space with a lead that will be difficult to overcome. The stock might experience sharp declines now and then, but there should be more ups than downs for Teladoc over the long run.

In Pakistan three pilot projects in telemedicine was initiated by the Ministry of IT & Telecom, Government of Pakistan (MoIT) through the Electronic Government Directorate in collaboration with Oratier Technologies (a pioneer company within Pakistan dealing with healthcare and HMIS) and PakDataCom (a bandwidth provider). Three hub stations through were linked via the Pak Sat-I communications satellite, and four districts were linked with another hub. A 312 Kb link was also established with remote sites and 1 Mbit/s bandwidth was provided at each hub. Three hubs were established: the Mayo Hospital (the largest hospital in Asia), JPMC Karachi and Holy Family Rawalpindi. These 12 remote sites were connected and on average of 1,500 patients being treated per month per hub. The project was still running smoothly after two years.[48]
Teladoc does not guarantee prescriptions. It is up to the doctor to recommend the best treatment. Teladoc doctors do not issue prescriptions for substances controlled by the DEA, non-therapeutic, and/or certain other drugs which may be harmful because of their potential for abuse. Also, non-therapeutic drugs such as Viagra and Cialis are not prescribed by Teladoc doctors.
Doctor On Demand is one of the best-funded Bay Area digital health companies. The region's top digital health startups pulled in $1.5 billion in 2016. As health care continues finding customers outside hospital walls, the industry has seen even brick-and-mortar providers investing in the tech. Fifty million Americans are now willing to switch doctors if given a video visit option, according to a recent trends report.
Informed consent is another issue – should the patient give informed consent to receive online care before it starts? Or will it be implied if it is care that can only practically be given over distance? When telehealth includes the possibility for technical problems such as transmission errors or security breaches or storage which impact on ability to communicate, it may be wise to obtain informed consent in person first, as well as having backup options for when technical issues occur. In person, a patient can see who is involved in their care (namely themselves and their clinician in a consult), but online there will be other involved such as the technology providers, therefore consent may need to involve disclosure of anyone involved in the transmission of the information and the security that will keep their information private, and any legal malpractice cases may need to involve all of those involved as opposed to what would usually just be the practitioner.[22][42][43]

Yes. Guided by technical standards and clinical practice guidelines, and backed by decades of research and demonstrations, telemedicine is a safe and cost-effective way to extend the delivery of health care.  ATA has produced a series of standards, guidelines and best practices for healthcare providers to ensure that they are using telemedicine responsibly.
A native of rural Washington, Katie Gieseke has practiced medicine since 2009, and provided virtual care since 2015. She received her undergraduate degree in Nursing from the University of Portland and received her Doctorate of Nursing Practice and Family Nurse Practitioner certification from the University of Washington. Her nursing career ranges from experience in the emergency department to home health assessments. During her time in the emergency department, she became interested in improving the effectiveness, efficiency and continuity of the health care system. She has a strong interest in illness prevention and look forward to having the time to spend with patients providing education on maintaining wellness, disease prevention and motivating patients to take control of their health.
We are currently partnered with over 145 facilities across 25 states and have over 12,000 patient encounters annually. Average response time for calls is three minutes, and we use redundant staffing procedures to ensure a medical specialist will always be available to assist your patients. By working together, we can drastically improve patient outcomes and your community’s access to specialty medical services.
Telehealth is a modern form of health care delivery. Telehealth breaks away from traditional health care delivery by using modern telecommunication systems including wireless communication methods.[11][12] Traditional health is legislated through policy to ensure the safety of medical practitioners and patients. Consequently, since telehealth is a new form of health care delivery that is now gathering momentum in the health sector, many organizations have started to legislate the use of telehealth into policy.[12][13] In New Zealand, the Medical Council has a statement about telehealth on their website. This illustrates that the medical council has foreseen the importance that telehealth will have on the health system and have started to introduce telehealth legislation to practitioners along with government.[14]
Telepsychiatry, another aspect of telemedicine, also utilizes videoconferencing for patients residing in underserved areas to access psychiatric services. It offers wide range of services to the patients and providers, such as consultation between the psychiatrists, educational clinical programs, diagnosis and assessment, medication therapy management, and routine follow-up meetings.[49] Most telepsychiatry is undertaken in real time (synchronous) although in recent years research at UC Davis has developed and validated the process of asynchronous telepsychiatry.[50] Recent reviews of the literature by Hilty et al. in 2013, and by Yellowlees et al. in 2015 confirmed that telepsychiatry is as effective as in-person psychiatric consultations for diagnostic assessment, is at least as good for the treatment of disorders such as depression and post traumatic stress disorder, and may be better than in-person treatment in some groups of patients, notably children, veterans and individuals with agoraphobia.
More accessible, convenient healthcare for patients is the driving force behind the telemedicine field. Telemedicine was originally developed in the U.S. as a way to address care shortages, especially in remote rural areas. Now telemedicine is used around the world, whether it’s to provide basic healthcare in third-world countries or allow an elderly patient with mobility issues to see the doctor from home. Telemedicine has the power not only to break down typical geographical barriers to care access, but to make the entire healthcare delivery model more convenient to patients.

In developed countries, health promotion efforts using telehealth have been met with some success. The Australian hands-free breastfeeding Google Glass application reported promising results in 2014. This application made in collaboration with the Australian Breastfeeding Association and a tech startup called Small World Social, helped new mothers learn how to breastfeed.[27][28][29] Breastfeeding is beneficial to infant health and maternal health and is recommended by the World Health Organisation and health organisations all over the world.[30][31] Widespread breastfeeding can prevent 820,000 infant deaths globally but the practice is often stopped prematurely or intents to do are disrupted due to lack of social support, know-how or other factors.[31] This application gave mother's hands-free information on breastfeeding, instructions on how to breastfeed and also had an option to call a lactation consultant over Google Hangout. When the trial ended, all participants were reported to be confident in breastfeeding.[29]
Patients should ask their doctor, hospital or healthcare provider about telemedicine services that are already available. In many cases, the provider may have an existing home health monitoring program or other telemedicine services.  There are also numerous private companies that sell basic telehealth services, including 24/7 access to a health professional, remote monitoring, medication adherence and online wellness apps.
“Another distinction between telemedicine and D2C telehealth is that telemedicine consultations are often with medical specialists like cardiologists, dermatologists and pulmonologists,” Downey continued. “These often occur when the patient is in an underserved rural community and the specialist is in a large urban area. The distance makes it difficult to make and keep appointments otherwise. D2C telehealth, on the other hand, best deals with minor primary care issues over the phone. If deemed to be a more serious health concern, the patient is told to make an appointment with a specialist or to proceed to a hospital emergency room.”
Teleophthalmology is a branch of telemedicine that delivers eye care through digital medical equipment and telecommunications technology. Today, applications of teleophthalmology encompass access to eye specialists for patients in remote areas, ophthalmic disease screening, diagnosis and monitoring; as well as distant learning. Teleophthalmology may help reduce disparities by providing remote, low-cost screening tests such as diabetic retinopathy screening to low-income and uninsured patients.[75][76] In Mizoram, India, a hilly area with poor roads, between 2011 till 2015, Tele-ophthalmology has provided care to over 10000 patients. These patients were examined by ophthalmic assistants locally but surgery was done on appointment after viewing the patient images online by Eye Surgeons in the hospital 6–12 hours away. Instead of an average 5 trips for say, a cataract procedure, only one was required for surgery alone as even post op care like stitch removal and glasses was done locally. There were huge cost savings in travel etc.[77]

Telenursing refers to the use of telecommunications and information technology in order to provide nursing services in health care whenever a large physical distance exists between patient and nurse, or between any number of nurses. As a field it is part of telehealth, and has many points of contacts with other medical and non-medical applications, such as telediagnosis, teleconsultation, telemonitoring, etc.
The development and history of telehealth or telemedicine (terms used interchangeably in literature) is deeply rooted in the history and development in not only technology but also society itself. Humans have long sought to relay important messages through torches, optical telegraphy, electroscopes, and wireless transmission. In the 21st century, with the advent of the internet, portable devices and other such digital devices are taking a transformative role in healthcare and its delivery.[5]

These emerging models produce virtual communities of learning and practice that embrace all members of the healthcare team. They are the latest point on the telemedicine continuum that began with the point-to-point connection achieved by Einthoven's pioneering electrocardiogram. Building out the connection established under telemedicine into an ever-expanding knowledge-sharing network can create new potential to improve health and save lives.
According to an SEC filing relating to its recent fundraising round, Teladoc brings in between $25 million and $100 million in sales. The company is also experimenting with taking a cut of the cost savings it delivers to health plans, which could boost revenue further. Revenue grew 75% in 2012, 100% in 2013 and is expected to grow another 100% this year, Gorevic says.
Healthcare systems that are thinking about implementing telemedicine solutions should consult with experts in the industry. VSee, a leading telemedicine organization, suggests that practices do not rush into telemedicine without having the right equipment. They offer a variety of practical solutions for practices wanting to add telemedicine to their clinic and can make the integration more seamless.
Teladoc's private funding rounds included $9 million in December 2009,[10] $4 million in January 2011,[11] $18.6 million in September 2011,[12] $15 million in September 2013,[13] and $50 million in September 2014.[14] On April 29, 2015, the company submitted preliminary confidential IPO paperwork, and on May 29, 2015 it publicly filed for its IPO.[15][16] On July 1, 2015, the company went public with a New York Stock Exchange-listed IPO at $19 per share, which gave the company a market capitalization of $758 million and an enterprise value of $620 million.[17] The initial response to the IPO was good: shares surged 50% on the opening day to close at $28.50,[3] after opening at $29.90 and trading as high as $31.90.[18]
“Although technology makes it easier for physicians and patients to communicate with one another, technology does nothing to change the sacred obligation that physicians have to deliver the best care for their patients,” he explained. “Our best physician users of telemedicine are those that embrace it as a way to be more efficient themselves, to be more respectful of patients’ time, and to reach a greater number of patients.”
In 2014, the government of Luxembourg, along with satellite operator, SES and NGOs, Archemed, Fondation Follereau, Friendship Luxembourg, German Doctors and Médecins Sans Frontières, established SATMED, a multilayer eHealth platform to improve public health in remote areas of emerging and developing countries, using the Emergency.lu disaster relief satellite platform and the Astra 2G TV satellite.[93] SATMED was first deployed in response to a report in 2014 by German Doctors of poor communications in Sierra Leone hampering the fight against Ebola, and SATMED equipment arrived in the Serabu clinic in Sierra Leone in December 2014.[94] In June 2015 SATMED was deployed at Maternité Hospital in Ahozonnoude, Benin to provide remote consultation and monitoring, and is the only effective communication link between Ahozonnoude, the capital and a third hospital in Allada, since land routes are often inaccessible due to flooding during the rainy season.[95][96]
While the loss of an in-person human interaction is often cited by skeptics of telemedicine, 76% of patients said they care more about access to healthcare than having an in-person interaction with their doctors. Also, only 16% if surveyed patients would rather go to the ER for minor conditions if they could instead use telemedicine for treatment. With the ongoing shortage of patient slots open with overburdened primary care doctors, these stat says a lot about patients’ willingness to try out telemedicine.
Dr. Barnett attended the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine and completed his residency at Swedish Family Medicine. He has over 12 years of experience in practice and began working in Virtual Care over nine years ago. When Dr. Barnett is not providing Virtual Care, he works as a primary care provider for a local health system. He is fluent in Russian and proficient in Spanish. Outside of work, Dr. Barnett enjoys cooking, watching films, photography, and spending time with family.
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