Telemedicine services can range widely by specialty. A surgeon might use telemedicine to do post-operation check-ins with patients, to make sure their wound is not infected. A gynecologist might use a live telemedicine solution to provide birth control counseling. An endocrinologist may do live videochats with patients to discuss recent lab results and answer questions.
But getting doctors to jump on board is easier said than done, and takes time. Many are afraid of liability, as it's possible to miss something during a remote visit. And for years, it wasn't clear whether they would get paid as much as an in-person visit. Reimbursement questions are still getting resolved across different states, but most of the commercial and government plans are on board with the idea of telemedicine -- at least in specific circumstances.
Store-and-forward is the oldest form of telehealth technology. It refers to the transmission of images or information from one provider to another. For example, if your doctor sends digital images of an x-ray to a radiologist for analysis, they are leveraging store-and-forward telehealth technology. This is one of the most common uses, but images and information of any type can be transmitted in this matter. One thing we should point out, however, is that store-and-forward telehealth is not always covered by state telemedicine reimbursement laws, even in states that require parity for real-time communication.

Visit Teladoc and set up an account using the information provided on your GuideStone/Highmark BCBS ID card. You'll also complete a medical history so that it's easy for the Teladoc physician to access when providing treatment. Or you can set up your account and provide your medical history by calling 1-800-TELADOC (1-800-835-2362). If they ask for your employer's name, be sure to tell them your coverage is provided through GuideStone/Highmark BCBS and provide the identification information from your ID card. Learn more about How to Register.
The doctors can treat flu symptoms, rashes, allergies, urinary tract infections, and bronchitis—and even prescribe medication—without ever physically seeing the patient. Gorevic says nurses then go back and review the charts to effectively audit the diagnoses and treatment. Teladoc refers about 1% of consultations to the E.R., and 5% to 6% to a primary care physician or urgent care center. (No, you can’t find a new doctor through Teladoc: The company prohibits its doctors from seeing their online patients in real life.) Soon, Teladoc plans to expand its specialty offerings to include dermatology and behavioral health.
With approximately 30-million cases of thyroid conditions across the U.S., including some 15-million which are undiagnosed, the need for fast and efficient prescriptions in this area is high. Women have a higher chance of contracting disorders of the thyroid, but they can affect men as well. Symptoms include anxiety, chronic fatigue syndrome, numbed senses of smell and taste, lowered sex drive, dry skin, stomach pain, digestive issues, high blood pressure, pain in the joints and muscles, heart palpitations, weight gain, hair loss, and uncontrollable body temperature.
Teleophthalmology is a branch of telemedicine that delivers eye care through digital medical equipment and telecommunications technology. Today, applications of teleophthalmology encompass access to eye specialists for patients in remote areas, ophthalmic disease screening, diagnosis and monitoring; as well as distant learning. Teleophthalmology may help reduce disparities by providing remote, low-cost screening tests such as diabetic retinopathy screening to low-income and uninsured patients.[75][76] In Mizoram, India, a hilly area with poor roads, between 2011 till 2015, Tele-ophthalmology has provided care to over 10000 patients. These patients were examined by ophthalmic assistants locally but surgery was done on appointment after viewing the patient images online by Eye Surgeons in the hospital 6–12 hours away. Instead of an average 5 trips for say, a cataract procedure, only one was required for surgery alone as even post op care like stitch removal and glasses was done locally. There were huge cost savings in travel etc.[77]
Oxford’s telemedicine definition is “the remote diagnosis and treatment of patients by means of telecommunications technology.” Telemedicine encompasses the use of technologies and telecommunication systems to administer healthcare to patients who are geographically separated from providers. For example, a radiologist may read and interpret the imaging results for a patient in a different county whose hospital does not currently have a radiologist on staff. Or a physician may conduct an urgent-care consultation via video for a non-life-threatening condition.
Telemedicine has come a long way and there’s still so much room for growth. Currently, telemedicine is used to conference specialists on important appointments when patients have no other access, to provide diagnosis and prescriptions to remote areas where access to a physician isn’t always possible, and even to assist in invasive surgeries when a high caliber surgeon can’t reach a patient in time.
"Being able to tie [telehealth] to a larger strategic goal is critical to success," said Mr. Heller. UnityPoint Health aimed to provide the same quality of care for lower acuity visits at a reduced cost. The company looked at more than 1,000 visits from its self-insured health plan, assessing the additional value it generated from its employees using telehealth rather than taking off of work for medical care.
Internet Protocol (IP): The protocol for sending data from one computer over the Internet to another. Every computer that is on the Internet has one address at least that identifies it uniquely from all of the other computers that are on the Internet. Internet Protocol is a connectionless form of protocol, meaning there isn’t a connection that is established between the two points that are communicating with one another. A videoconferencing system’s IP address is its telephone number.
When the American National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), began plans to send astronauts into space, the need for Telemedicine became clear. In order to monitor their astronauts in space, telemedicine capabilities were built into the spacecraft as well as the first spacesuits.[5][8] Additionally, during this period, telehealth and Telemedicine were promoted in different countries especially the United States and Canada.[5]
BayCareAnywhere allows you and your children two years and older instant access to a board-certified doctor from any place at any time, day or night. You can video chat with a doctor from the comfort of your own home for just $45 per visit. If the doctor determines that you need to be seen in-person at an urgent care center, you can print your patient summary and present it at any BayCare Urgent Care to receive a $45 discount off your visit. 
Remote surgery (also known as telesurgery) is the ability for a doctor to perform surgery on a patient even though they are not physically in the same location. It is a form of telepresence. Remote surgery combines elements of robotics, cutting edge communication technology such as high-speed data connections, haptics and elements of management information systems. While the field of robotic surgery is fairly well established, most of these robots are controlled by surgeons at the location of the surgery.
However, whether or not the standard of health care quality is increasing is quite debatable, with literature refuting such claims.[23][34][35] Research is increasingly reporting that clinicians find the process difficult and complex to deal with.[34][36] Furthermore, there are concerns around informed consent, legality issues as well as legislative issues. Although health care may become affordable with the help of technology, whether or not this care will be "good" is the issue.[23]
Store and Forward – This is a form of telehealth consultation which uses images from the patients to come up with the medical diagnosis. The different types of Store and Forward services include dermatology, radiology and wound care. It may also include transferring of patients’ clinical data like ECG and blood test results from the patients’ site to the hospital’s site.
Teladoc (NYSE:TDOC) is the global leader in virtual care. A mission-driven organization, the company is successfully modernizing how people access and experience healthcare, with a focus on high quality, lower costs, and improved outcomes around the world. The company’s award-winning, integrated clinical solutions are inclusive of telehealth, expert medical opinions, AI and analytics, and licensable platform services. With more than 2,000 employees, the organization delivers care in 125 countries and in more than 20 languages, partnering with employers, hospitals and health systems, and insurers to transform care delivery.
The future appears to be bright for virtual healthcare services. Patients like using the services because of the convenience. Payers like virtual healthcare because it lowers their costs. As overall healthcare costs increase with more older individuals across the world, telehealth should experience even more growth as a way to control costs without angering patients. 
Telemedicine is the use of telecommunication and information technology to provide clinical health care from a distance. It has been used to overcome distance barriers and to improve access to medical services that would often not be consistently available in distant rural communities. It is also used to save lives in critical care and emergency situations.
Type of telehealth. Medicare primarily only reimburses for live telemedicine, where the physician and patient are interacting in real-time through secure, videochat. This type of telemedicine visit is meant to substitute a face-to-face in-person visit. The only exception is in Hawaii and Alaska, where Medicare reimburses for store-and-forward telemedicine as well.
More accessible, convenient healthcare for patients is the driving force behind the telemedicine field. Telemedicine was originally developed in the U.S. as a way to address care shortages, especially in remote rural areas. Now telemedicine is used around the world, whether it’s to provide basic healthcare in third-world countries or allow an elderly patient with mobility issues to see the doctor from home. Telemedicine has the power not only to break down typical geographical barriers to care access, but to make the entire healthcare delivery model more convenient to patients.
As various parties seek more efficient ways to provide care at less cost to the patient, telemedicine's role has grown. It is often a time-saving way for a consumer to see and speak to a clinician for minor and non-urgent medical needs instead of going to a primary care physician's office or emergency department. In recent years, many states have passed laws that make telemedicine easier to practice, and federal health regulators are also exploring ways to further grant Medicare reimbursements for telemedicine services.

Online doctor consultation are rapidly gaining popularity these days as more health insurers offer telemedicine services to help cut costs. Studies have shown that virtual care may effectively used to treat common problems such as flu, acne, deer tick bites, sinus and urinary tract infections. Video doctor consultations can save patients a lot in time and convenience. 
Dr. Barnett attended the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine and completed his residency at Swedish Family Medicine. He has over 12 years of experience in practice and began working in Virtual Care over nine years ago. When Dr. Barnett is not providing Virtual Care, he works as a primary care provider for a local health system. He is fluent in Russian and proficient in Spanish. Outside of work, Dr. Barnett enjoys cooking, watching films, photography, and spending time with family.
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