At Regis, we give you more pathways to pursue your goals in healthcare administration. As a dedicated leader of health administration education, we welcome ambition-driven, self-motivated professionals like you from all health care settings. Gain special insight into areas like management, communications, health informatics, and health policy through our Online Master of Health Administration.
Doctor On Demand’s mission is to improve the world’s health through compassionate care and innovation. We believe that health is personal, and means so much more than treating illness. We’re proud of the care we've provided over the years and the relationships we’ve developed with our patients, as evidenced by the 5-star reviews we continually receive. People use our service to gain access to some of the best physicians and licensed therapists in the country, all whenever and wherever is most convenient. It’s as simple as opening the Doctor On Demand app on a smartphone or computer.
Patients who are planning to visit India for medical treatment can make the most of our Medical Tourism service. We are associated with the best hospitals and through our secure virtual platform we can assist you 8/7 between 11 AM to 7 PM and connect you with the best doctors online to resolve your medical concern. Get everything you need to know about various treatments before planning your travel. Receive pre and post travel assistance, plan the right treatment procedure, compare cost options and stay connected with your doctor online after returning to your home country.
Restrictive licensure laws in the United States require a practitioner to obtain a full license to deliver telemedicine care across state lines. Typically, states with restrictive licensure laws also have several exceptions (varying from state to state) that may release an out-of-state practitioner from the additional burden of obtaining such a license. A number of states require practitioners who seek compensation to frequently deliver interstate care to acquire a full license.
A patient might find themselves in need of services from Express Med Refills for a variety of reasons, the most common being inaccessible family doctors. From time to time, even the most dedicated physician takes a vacation, and while most leave a proxy, or address patient needs before departing, there is the odd case of a patient being left in dire need of a prescription refill. Through our website, Americans can gain access to a U.S. registered online doctor, conduct a one on one consultation, and have a prescription sent to a nearby local pharmacy all on the same day.

There’s a lot to be optimistic about in the future of telemedicine. With rapid advances in technology, it’s likely that telemedicine will only become easier and more widely accepted in the coming years. Already, smart glasses (like Google Glass) and smart watches (like the Apple Watch) can monitor patients’ health data and transmit them in real time to health professionals. Programs like clmtrackr can analyze a person’s emotional state based on their facial expressions and could be used to monitor mental wellness. Digital health startups like Augmedix, are experimenting with automatically transcribing documentation during a patient visit. Advances in robotic surgeries allow surgeons to operate on patients from afar.

Even the American Telemedicine Association also considers telemedicine and telehealth to be interchangeable. “While the term telehealth is sometimes used to refer to a broader definition of remote healthcare that does not always involve clinical services, (the) ATA uses the terms in the same way one would refer to medicine or health in the common vernacular,” the organization states. 
Telehealth allows multiple, different disciplines to merge and deliver a much more uniform level of care using the efficiency and accessibility of everyday technology. As telehealth proliferates mainstream healthcare and challenges notions of traditional healthcare delivery, different populations are starting to experience better quality, access and personalised care in their lives.[22][23]
Ravyn Ramos has practiced medicine since 2009 and provided virtual care since 2014. She received her Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine degree from Bastyr University in 2004, and her Master of Nursing from Seattle University in 2007. In addition to her work in telemedicine, she serves as clinical faculty in Walden University's distance learning program, as well as practicing as a Family Nurse Practitioner in several local medical centers. In her spare time, she enjoys Bikram yoga, baking bread, traveling and watching the Sounders.
Based on over 600 studies, the AMA has put together a comprehensive set of guidelines for professionals using telemedicine in primary and urgent care – a field that is quickly adopting telemedicine to expand basic healthcare access. Here are some of the basic protocols and rules a primary care or urgent care facility should put into place when starting their telemedicine program.
Clinicians are conquering distance and providing access to patients who are not able to travel by providing appointments utilizing real-time video communication platforms. Video conferencing technology has been utilized to provide care for inmates, military personnel, and patients located in rural locations for some time. Also, suppliers of both care and financing such as Kaiser Permanente, the Defense Department, and the Department of Veterans Affairs have been exploiting telehealth modalities to increase access to healthcare services and promote better care quality. In another example, S.C. Department of Corrections and the Medical University of South Carolina are using video scopes and high-resolution cameras to diagnose and treat inmates remotely. They are also conducting virtual appointments using video/audio communication applications to reduce prisoner transportation costs and increase safety by keeping inmates in and providers out of correctional facilities.
All the doctors in Teladoc's national network are U.S. board-certified family practitioners, primary care physicians, pediatricians and internists who use Electronic Health Records to diagnose, treat and write prescriptions when necessary. When accessing Teladoc, you'll be connected to a doctor in your state. These doctors are all actively practicing physicians and choose to incorporate telemedicine into their medical practice as a way to offer more affordable, convenient access to quality care.
Physicians and patients can share information in real time from one computer screen to another. And they can even see and capture readings from medical devices at a faraway location. Using telemedicine software, patients can see a doctor for diagnosis and treatment without having to wait for an appointment. Patients can consult a physician at the comfort of their home.
Thanks to telemedicine, physicians have the wonderful opportunity to connect with clients wherever they are. Patients who once could not see a physician due to access to care issues, can now do so almost seamlessly. However, many may wonder what is telemedicine’s most valuable applications? We’ll discover a few popular ways that telemedicine is used today.
“Although technology makes it easier for physicians and patients to communicate with one another, technology does nothing to change the sacred obligation that physicians have to deliver the best care for their patients,” he explained. “Our best physician users of telemedicine are those that embrace it as a way to be more efficient themselves, to be more respectful of patients’ time, and to reach a greater number of patients.”
Real-time telemedicine (also called “synchronous telemedicine”) is probably what most people first think of when they hear “telemedicine.” Real-time telemedicine requires a live interaction between either a health professional and patient, or between health professionals, using audio and video communication. Think videochat. While most real-time telemedicine software is much more sophisticated than a simple videochat platform, the basic goal is to both see and talk to the patient from afar. This type of telemedicine is meant to offer a virtual alternative to the in-person doctor’s visit.
Online doctor consultation are rapidly gaining popularity these days as more health insurers offer telemedicine services to help cut costs. Studies have shown that virtual care may effectively used to treat common problems such as flu, acne, deer tick bites, sinus and urinary tract infections. Video doctor consultations can save patients a lot in time and convenience. 
Telehealth Private Payers Reimbursement: There is no federal mandate requiring private payers to reimburse for telehealth services, but several states have enacted telehealth parity laws. Parity laws compel payers to cover the same types of services provided through telehealth as those that are provided face-to-face. They also require payers to reimburse telehealth services at the same payment rate as in-clinic services.

Doctor on Demand is a telemedicine service that gives you access to medical doctors 24/7/365 for the treatment of common and worrisome ailments such as urinary tract infections, skin and eye issues, and minor sports injuries. These problems can sometimes lead to trips to the emergency room simply because you cannot get to your doctor in a timely manner. With this service, you register, request a doctor and meet one quickly via your computer or smart device.

In 1964, the Nebraska Psychiatric Institute began using television links to form two-way communication with the Norfolk State Hospital which was 112 miles away for the education and consultation purposes between clinicians in the two locations.[9] The Logan International Airport in Boston established in-house medical stations in 1967. These stations were linked to Massachusetts General Hospital. Clinicians at the hospital would provide consultation services to patients who were at the airport. Consultations were achieved through microwave audio as well as video links.[5][9]


Telehealth is defined as the delivery and facilitation of health and health-related services including medical care, provider and patient education, health information services, and self-care via telecommunications and digital communication technologies. Live video conferencing, mobile health apps, “store and forward” electronic transmission, and remote patient monitoring (RPM) are examples of technologies used in telehealth.
NewYork-Presbyterian is making investments in all of these because it believes telemedicine and virtual medicine in general will make delivery of care more efficient and higher-quality in the long run, he explained. Each telemedicine modality has its own associated cost and reimbursement, and the organization is making decisions on where to put its efforts not based on net revenue but on the impact that each will have for patients, he added.

Leading telemedicine companies like VSee, assists healthcare organizations in being able to treat patients with chronic diseases. They recognize that 75% of the United States healthcare spending is dedicated to treating heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. As a result, they’ve created telemedicine solutions that can keep physicians abreast from hospital to home. In addition, the patient, their family members, and other healthcare professionals can collaborate in the patient care process.

Telemedicine is viewed as a cost-effective alternative to the more traditional face-to-face way of providing medical care (e.g., face-to-face consultations or examinations between provider and patient). As such, states have the option/flexibility to determine whether (or not) to cover telemedicine; what types of telemedicine to cover; where in the state it can be covered; how it is provided/covered; what types of telemedicine practitioners/providers may be covered/reimbursed, as long as such practitioners/providers are "recognized" and qualified according to Medicaid statute/regulation; and how much to reimburse for telemedicine services, as long as such payments do not exceed Federal Upper Limits.

Telehealth is defined as the delivery and facilitation of health and health-related services including medical care, provider and patient education, health information services, and self-care via telecommunications and digital communication technologies. Live video conferencing, mobile health apps, “store and forward” electronic transmission, and remote patient monitoring (RPM) are examples of technologies used in telehealth.


Healthcare systems that adopt telemedicine solutions can attest that it requires a lot of time and money. Implementing a new system requires training and sometimes staff members find it difficult to welcome this change. Practice managers, nurses, physicians, and more have to learn how to utilize the system so that practices can see the benefits. Although telemedicine is expensive in the beginning, healthcare systems should see a positive return on investment over time due to more patients and less staff.
Although there were distant precursors to telemedicine, it is essentially a product of 20th century telecommunication and information technologies. These technologies permit communications between patient and medical staff with both convenience and fidelity, as well as the transmission of medical, imaging and health informatics data from one site to another.
Two important areas of telerehabilitation research are (1) demonstrating equivalence of assessment and therapy to in-person assessment and therapy, and (2) building new data collection systems to digitize information that a therapist can use in practice. Ground-breaking research in telehaptics (the sense of touch) and virtual reality may broaden the scope of telerehabilitation practice, in the future.

In-office visits and overnight stays at healthcare facilities can be difficult for individuals in poor health. Telehealth services reduce hospital readmission rates by enabling doctors to monitor patients outside the office. Because of this, many hospitals have already started to include some form of remote monitoring as part of their post-discharge plans. By equipping patients with wearable devices or other wireless technologies, clinicians can monitor vital signs and symptoms and adjust care as needed without an in-office visit. Alignment Healthcare, for example, developed a program to remotely monitor chronically ill and recently discharged patients and reduce 30-day readmission rates. Enrollees were given a package of Bluetooth-enabled monitoring equipment, including a Samsung tablet, blood pressure cuff, pulse oximeter and scale.
Project ECHO, a knowledge-sharing enterprise that works both across the U.S. and globally, offers a good example of how technology-enabled collaborative learning models work. Launched initially in New Mexico to help patients with hepatitis C gain access to specialty treatment, Project ECHO connects a team of specialists at a university medical center "hub" with teams of primary-care clinicians at community health centers—or "spokes"—across a state or region. This connection is recurring: Typically, it takes place every week or every other week, during telementoring clinics that operate like virtual grand rounds.
Traditional use of telehealth services has been for specialist treatment. However, there has been a paradigm shift and telehealth is no longer considered a specialist service.[15] This development has ensured that many access barriers are eliminated, as medical professionals are able to use wireless communication technologies to deliver health care.[16] This is evident in rural communities. For individuals living in rural communities, specialist care can be some distance away, particularly in the next major city. Telehealth eliminates this barrier, as health professionals are able to conduct a medical consultation through the use of wireless communication technologies. However, this process is dependent on both parties having Internet access.[16][17][18]
Mobile Telehealth Clinic – This involves using vehicles like van, trailer or any mobile unit to provide health care services for patients. The services are given by health care professionals. This is helpful to those who are living on areas far from the hospital. Some mobile units are equipped with medical technologies that are found in the hospital like mobile CT, MRI and TeleDentistry.
Telenursing refers to the use of telecommunications and information technology in order to provide nursing services in health care whenever a large physical distance exists between patient and nurse, or between any number of nurses. As a field it is part of telehealth, and has many points of contacts with other medical and non-medical applications, such as telediagnosis, teleconsultation, telemonitoring, etc.
Yes. Guided by technical standards and clinical practice guidelines, and backed by decades of research and demonstrations, telemedicine is a safe and cost-effective way to extend the delivery of health care.  ATA has produced a series of standards, guidelines and best practices for healthcare providers to ensure that they are using telemedicine responsibly.
Did you know that there are different types of telemedicine? That’s right, there are a few different ways that healthcare systems can use telemedicine to assist patients. As discussed in previous articles, telemedicine is the method of using telecommunications to connect patients and providers over a distance. Today, there are three different types of telemedicine used and it includes the following:
The definition of telemedicine is somewhat controversial. Some definitions (such as the definition given by the World Health Organization[2]) include all aspects of healthcare including preventive care. The American Telemedicine Association uses the terms telemedicine and telehealth interchangeably, although it acknowledges that telehealth is sometimes used more broadly for remote health not involving active clinical treatments.[3]
In the last decade, rapid advances in medicine and technology has resulted in the use of new terms. Policymakers, healthcare systems, advocacy groups, and vendors may unknowingly use terms incorrectly when discussing medicine and technology. This is especially true when it comes to the terms, telemedicine and telehealth. Although the words are often used interchangeably, there is certainly a difference between the two.
The Health Resources Services Administration defines telehealth as the use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support long-distance clinical health care, patient and professional health-related education, public health and health administration. Technologies include videoconferencing, the internet, store-and-forward imaging, streaming media, and terrestrial and wireless communications.
Telenursing is achieving significant growth rates in many countries due to several factors: the preoccupation in reducing the costs of health care, an increase in the number of aging and chronically ill population, and the increase in coverage of health care to distant, rural, small or sparsely populated regions. Among its benefits, telenursing may help solve increasing shortages of nurses; to reduce distances and save travel time, and to keep patients out of hospital. A greater degree of job satisfaction has been registered among telenurses.[22]
"Unless you plan to stay away from other people and public places during this time of year, the flu shot is your best form of protection from the flu,” Dr. Kristin Dean, associate medical director at @drondemand, tells @EliteDaily.https://www.elitedaily.com/p/are-flu-shots-really-necessary-more-people-are-opting-out-of-the-shot-survey-says-14706423 …
This system enabled wireless transmission of ECG from the moving ICU van or the patients home to the central station in ICU of the department of Medicine. Transmission using wireless was done using frequency modulation which eliminated noise. Transmission was also done through telephone lines. The ECG output was connected to the telephone input using a modulator which converted ECG into high frequency sound. At the other end a demodulator reconverted the sound into ECG with a good gain accuracy. The ECG was converted to sound waves with a frequency varying from 500 Hz to 2500 Hz with 1500 Hz at baseline.

Clinicians are conquering distance and providing access to patients who are not able to travel by providing appointments utilizing real-time video communication platforms. Video conferencing technology has been utilized to provide care for inmates, military personnel, and patients located in rural locations for some time. Also, suppliers of both care and financing such as Kaiser Permanente, the Defense Department, and the Department of Veterans Affairs have been exploiting telehealth modalities to increase access to healthcare services and promote better care quality. In another example, S.C. Department of Corrections and the Medical University of South Carolina are using video scopes and high-resolution cameras to diagnose and treat inmates remotely. They are also conducting virtual appointments using video/audio communication applications to reduce prisoner transportation costs and increase safety by keeping inmates in and providers out of correctional facilities.
In its mHealth Roadmap, the Health Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) muddies the waters a bit. It uses the Health and Human Services Definition for telehealth — “the use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support remote clinical healthcare, patient and professional health-related education, public health and health administration” — then goes on to say that “telemedicine usage ranges from synchronous video chat between a patient and a doctor, to conferencing between doctors, to conferencing between doctors and allied health professionals (e.g., nutritionists, physical therapists), to providing live or recorded presentations to groups of patients who are geographically separated.”
“Telemedicine is the natural evolution of healthcare in the digital world,” American Telemedicine Association. Telemedicine empowers the caregivers to remotely interact with their patients, which greatly improves both the efficiency and affordability of healthcare. Today patients, doctors and caregivers have learned to accept telemedicine (often called ‘telehealth’ or ‘connected health’) as one of many ways of delivering care.
Telehealth is sometimes discussed interchangeably with telemedicine. The Health Resources and Services Administration distinguishes telehealth from telemedicine in its scope. According to them, telemedicine only describes remote clinical services; such as diagnosis and monitoring, while telehealth includes preventative, promotive and curative care delivery.[1] This includes the above-mentioned non-clinical applications like administration and provider education which make telehealth the preferred modern terminology.[2]
Alan Pitt, MD, is a neuroradiologist at Barrow Neurological Institute. He is the former chief medical officer of Avizia, which was acquired by American Well earlier this year. Dr. Pitt also serves as an advisor to several health IT companies and operates his own podcast. He offers a four-pronged framework to examine the current world of telemedicine: direct-to-consumer, self-service, clinician collaboration, and "spaces."
"Unless you plan to stay away from other people and public places during this time of year, the flu shot is your best form of protection from the flu,” Dr. Kristin Dean, associate medical director at @drondemand, tells @EliteDaily.https://www.elitedaily.com/p/are-flu-shots-really-necessary-more-people-are-opting-out-of-the-shot-survey-says-14706423 …
While Doctor on Demand’s chief executive Adam Jackson says the start-up targets mainly retail customers who pay $40 for 10 minutes or so with a physician, it signed up Comcast , its first major corporate customer which will subsidize its employees video visits. Doctor on Demand has a network of more than 1,400 general practitioners, internists and pediatricians in 47 states. They diagnose simple ailments, such as pink eye, sore throat and allergies. Insurance doesn’t reimburse video consultations, but customers can use pre-tax dollars from their health savings account to pay.
Teledermatology allows dermatology consultations over a distance using audio, visual and data communication, and has been found to improve efficiency.[70] Applications comprise health care management such as diagnoses, consultation and treatment as well as (continuing medical) education.[71][72][73] The dermatologists Perednia and Brown were the first to coin the term "teledermatology" in 1995. In a scientific publication, they described the value of a teledermatologic service in a rural area underserved by dermatologists.[74]
With telemedicine, a medical practice or hospital system can immediately expand access to niche medical specialists. This makes it easy for primary care doctors to consult medical specialists on a patient case, and for patients to see a needed specialist on a rare form of cancer, no matter their location. As another example, small hospitals without adequate radiology specialist on-staff can outsource evaluation of x-rays via telemedicine.
With telemedicine, a medical practice or hospital system can immediately expand access to niche medical specialists. This makes it easy for primary care doctors to consult medical specialists on a patient case, and for patients to see a needed specialist on a rare form of cancer, no matter their location. As another example, small hospitals without adequate radiology specialist on-staff can outsource evaluation of x-rays via telemedicine.

“Telemedicine is not a separate medical specialty,” the organization continues. “Products and services related to telemedicine are often part of a larger investment by healthcare institutions in either information technology or the delivery of clinical care. Even in the reimbursement fee structure, there is usually no distinction made between services provided on site and those provided through telemedicine and often no separate coding required for billing of remote services. ATA has historically considered telemedicine and telehealth to be interchangeable terms, encompassing a wide definition of remote healthcare. Patient consultations via video conferencing, transmission of still images, e-health including patient portals, remote monitoring of vital signs, continuing medical education, consumer-focused wireless applications and nursing call centers, among other applications, are all considered part of telemedicine and telehealth.”


In addition to the parity laws, some states require providers to obtain patient consent before using telehealth services. Failure to obtain patient consent may result in physicians not being paid. Providers also have to be aware that while some states do not legally require consent, if they bill telemedicine through Medicaid, they will need written consent.

When a healthcare service decides to provide telehealth to its patients, there are steps to consider, besides just whether the above resources are available. A needs assessment is the best way to start, which includes assessing the access the community currently has to the proposed specialists and care, whether the organisation currently has underutilized equipment which will make them useful to the area they are trying to service, and the hardships they are trying to improve by providing the access to their intended community (i.e. Travel time, costs, time off work).[1][2] A service then needs to consider potential collaborators. Other services may exist in the area with similar goals who could be joined to provide a more holistic service, and/or they may already have telehealth resources available. The more services involved, the easier to spread the cost of IT, training, workflow changes and improve buy-in from clients. Services need to have the patience to wait for the accrued benefits of providing their telehealth service and cannot necessarily expect community-wide changes reflected straight away.[1]
Jamee has provided care since 2002, and provided virtual care since 2015. She received her Bachelor and Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Texas in Houston. Jamee has spent the majority of her nursing career with a focus in emergency and urgent care, transitioning her focus to Family Practice in 2014. She recently relocated to the Northwest from Dallas with her husband and five children. She enjoys reading, crafts, cooking and camping.
×