Referring to health information services, health care education, and health care services in a broad sense, the term telehealth is an all-encompassing one. In fact, telecare and telemedicine are generally covered within the broader scope of the term telehealth. Included in telehealth are health education services, remote monitoring of vital signs, ECG or blood pressure and remote doctor-patient consultations (telemedicine). Telehealth technology enables the remote diagnoses and evaluation of patients in addition to the ability to remote detection of fluctuations in the medical condition of the patient at home so that the medications or the specific therapy can be altered accordingly. It also allows for e-prescribe medications and remotely prescribed treatments.
It is common for outlying healthcare facilities to transfer unnecessarily or forced to refer patients to complex cases that are beyond the knowledge-base of the local providers. Patients are therefore frequently transported over long distances to get direct care or for specialist’s consultation. These referrals and transfers can be quite costly for the patient since they present clinical, operational and financial challenges to all the parties that are involved. Telemedicine can curb such issues, reduce the frequency of travel and deliver considerable efficiencies and returns for all parties involved.
Because of telemedicine, physicians can access patient medical records without being onsite. Some telemedicine providers offer the ability to do data entry using a point-and-click method or video/handwriting recognition. This can cut down on the amount of time that physicians dedicate to administrative tasks. As a result, physicians can see more patients or spend more time with those cases that are more complex.
These devices can be packed into a kit and sent out into the field. In this way, telemedicine has proved extremely useful in rural and developing countries like Gabon, Iraqi Kurdistan, and Nigeria, where there is very little access to high-quality medical care. Telemedicine eliminates the barrier of distance and improves access to medical services that would otherwise not be available in distant rural communities.   
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Despite the current reimbursement challenges, there are numerous benefits to increasing the use of telehealth to meet the nation’s demand for health care. Convenience of care, increased access, improved worker productivity from not having to take time off and travel to appointments, decreased costs, and clinician time savings are a few. For these reasons, providers, payers, and employers alike are moving forward with more and more telehealth solutions.
Originally, health professionals developed this technology to reach remote patients living in the rural areas. But with time, medical staff and the U.S. government saw the big picture – the potential to reach urban populations with healthcare shortages, and to respond to medical emergencies by sharing medical consults and patient health records without delay. In the 1960s, heavy investments from the U.S. Government, including the Public Health Department, NASA, Department of Defense, and the Health and Human Sciences Department drove research and innovation in telemedicine. Sending cardiac rhythms during emergencies started at about this time. For instance, in Miami, the university medical center worked together with the fire rescue department by sending electro-cardiac rhythm signals over the voice radio channels from the rescue sites.
As the CCHP notes, different organizations have different definitions for telehealth. California very specifically defines it as “the mode of delivering healthcare services and public health via information and communication technologies to facilitate the diagnosis, consultation, treatment, education, care management and self-management of a patient's healthcare while the patient is at the originating site and the healthcare provider is at a distant site. Telehealth facilitates patient self-management and caregiver support for patients and includes synchronous interactions and asynchronous store and forward transfers.” The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), meanwhile, defines it as “the use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support long-distance clinical healthcare, patient and professional health-related education, public health and health administration.”

While the industry is still a long way from a standard set of established guidelines for telemedicine, the American Telemedicine Association has put together guidelines for a range of specialties based on a survey hundreds of research study. What are the clinical, technical, and administrative guidelines a medical practice needs to put in place when they’re adopting telemedicine? Beyond the minimal legal requirements of that state, what are telemedicine best practices?
Teleradiology – Teleradiology is actually one of the earliest fields of telemedicine, beginning in the 1960s. Teleradiology solutions were developed to expand access to diagnosticians of x-rays. Smaller hospitals around the U.S. may not always have a radiologist on staff, or may not have access to one around the clock. That means patients coming into the ER, especially during off-hours, will have to wait for diagnosis. Teleradiology solutions now offer providers at one location to send a patient’s x-rays and records securely to a qualified radiologist at another location, and get a quick consult on the patient’s condition.
Symptoms occur due to a swelling of the breathing tubes, which makes it difficult for air to pass into the lungs. For those who smoke cigarettes, suffer from obesity, or live with allergies, these symptoms are more severe. By speaking with a U.S. doctor through your consultation, you can receive a prescription for the proper medication to treat asthma. To treat your symptoms,click herefor more information! .
Tim Panek has worked in primary care since 1999 and provided virtual care since 2011. He received his Master of Nursing from the University of Washington and has worked in many primary and urgent care settings in Washington State. He is an adjunct clinical faculty member at the University of Washington School of Nursing. He is also a high school soccer coach and enjoys golf, fly-fishing, skiing and hiking with his family.
The rate of adoption of telehealth services in any jurisdiction is frequently influenced by factors such as the adequacy and cost of existing conventional health services in meeting patient needs; the policies of governments and/or insurers with respect to coverage and payment for telehealth services; and medical licensing requirements that may inhibit or deter the provision of telehealth second opinions or primary consultations by physicians.
“Telehealth is not a specific service, but a collection of means to enhance care and education delivery,” says the Center for Connected Health Policy (CCHP). CCHP further classify telehealth into four types of services, live-video conferencing, mobile health, remote patient monitoring, and store-and-forward. Most telehealth platforms provide one or more of these services, to a niche patient or consumer segment.

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In the last decade, rapid advances in medicine and technology has resulted in the use of new terms. Policymakers, healthcare systems, advocacy groups, and vendors may unknowingly use terms incorrectly when discussing medicine and technology. This is especially true when it comes to the terms, telemedicine and telehealth. Although the words are often used interchangeably, there is certainly a difference between the two.
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Interactive medicine, also known as “live telemedicine”, allows patients and physicians to communicate in real-time while also maintaining HIPAA compliance. Communication methods include both phone consultations and video conferences. Physicians can assess a patient’s medical history, perform psychiatric evaluations, and more using interactive medicine.
Symptoms occur due to a swelling of the breathing tubes, which makes it difficult for air to pass into the lungs. For those who smoke cigarettes, suffer from obesity, or live with allergies, these symptoms are more severe. By speaking with a U.S. doctor through your consultation, you can receive a prescription for the proper medication to treat asthma. To treat your symptoms,click herefor more information! .

Medicare pays for telemedicine services under certain circumstances. Primarily, Medicare covers live telemedicine services, or virtual visits delivered via interactive audio and video (think videochat). The goal is to cover medical services delivered virtually where an in-person visit may be difficult for the patient or provider. Store-and-forward telemedicine services are only covered in Hawaii and Alaska at this time.


A question popular among organizations that want to implement telemedicine solutions is regarding how their physicians will be reimbursed. With telehealth regulations varying for each state and with payers setting up different policies, it is difficult to find consistency. What does remain consistent is that telemedicine is advancing and its becoming difficult for the key players to keep up.
An example of these limitations include the current American reimbursement infrastructure, where Medicare will reimburse for telehealth services only when a patient is living in an area where specialists are in shortage, or in particular rural counties. The area is defined by whether it is a medical facility as opposed to a patient's' home. The site that the practitioner is in, however, is unrestricted. Medicare will only reimburse live video (synchronous) type services, not store-and-forward, mhealth or remote patient monitoring (if it does not involve live-video). Some insurers currently will reimburse telehealth, but not all yet. So providers and patients must go to the extra effort of finding the correct insurers before continuing. Again in America, states generally tend to require that clinicians are licensed to practice in the surgery' state, therefore they can only provide their service if licensed in an area that they do not live in themselves.[1]
This system enabled wireless transmission of ECG from the moving ICU van or the patients home to the central station in ICU of the department of Medicine. Transmission using wireless was done using frequency modulation which eliminated noise. Transmission was also done through telephone lines. The ECG output was connected to the telephone input using a modulator which converted ECG into high frequency sound. At the other end a demodulator reconverted the sound into ECG with a good gain accuracy. The ECG was converted to sound waves with a frequency varying from 500 Hz to 2500 Hz with 1500 Hz at baseline.
The evolution and standardization of 5G has been a long process, but the technology could lead to major advancements in numerous areas like the smart home, media consumption, augmented reality, self-driving cars, telemedicine, and more. — Verge Staff, The Verge, "The road to 5G: the biggest news on next-gen mobile networks," 24 Feb. 2017 But now the clinic has expanded services to the surrounding community, offering primary care and specialty care services via telemedicine, including neurology, cardiology and diabetes education. — Maria Clark, NOLA.com, "Ochsner and NASA partner to open a health center at the Michoud Assembly Facility," 21 Mar. 2018 Such speeds are promoted as aiding the development of new technology in the fields of cloud robotics, telemedicine, connected cars and drones, augmented and virtual reality and more. — Ileana Najarro, Houston Chronicle, "Sprint to bring 5G mobile speeds to Houston this year," 27 Feb. 2018 Thus employees lack a strong financial incentive to seek out cheaper options, such as using a telemedicine service to diagnose pinkeye or having a hip replaced at an ambulatory surgery center instead of a hospital. — Joel Klein, WSJ, "The IRS Can Save American Health Care," 1 July 2018 The bill also has provisions meant to encourage telemedicine, and to add doctors to the state VA programs. — Erica Martinson, Anchorage Daily News, "What the new VA health care bill means for Alaska’s veterans," 24 May 2018 When patients report symptoms that are too complex to handle via telemedicine, Lemonaid doctors refund their money and urge them to see a doctor in person. — Rebecca Robbins, STAT, "A startup promised to make health care ‘refreshingly simple.’ Building the business has been anything but," 26 Apr. 2018 Folks can find a telemedicine service by contacting their insurance company (some have their own service) or local medical centers. — Houston Chronicle, "Hookah health news from your very own galaxy," 1 July 2018 The two topics at hand on this day: Whether to subsidize space exploration and whether to increase the use of telemedicine. — Kevin Kelleher, Fortune, "IBM's Jeopardy-Winning AI Is Now Ready to Debate You," 19 June 2018
Telehealth, the use of electronic communication to remotely provide health care information and services, is gaining more and more attention as providers, patients, and payers all seek more effective and cost-efficient ways to deliver care. Physical therapy is no exception, and while those services have developed mostly in rural areas to accommodate the long distances between patients and providers, telehealth in physical therapy is being considered in other geographic and clinical settings.
Telemedicine is a subset of telehealth, which includes both remote clinical service delivery and nonclinical elements of the healthcare system. In practice, however, the two terms are often used interchangeably. While eCare is often used as a synonym for telemedicine, the Federal Communications Commission adopted the term eCare as an umbrella concept for the electronic exchange of information to aid in the practice of advanced analytics and medicine.
Telemedicine is an important and quickly growing component of healthcare delievery in the United States.  There are currently about 200 telemedicine networks, with 3,500 service sites in the US.  In 2011 alone the Veterans Health Administration delivered over 300,000 remote consultations using telemedicine. More than half of all U.S. hospitals now use some form of telemedicine.
While telemedicine is the older of the two phrases, telehealth is rapidly gaining acceptance, in large part because of the evolution of the healthcare landscape. The rise of consumer-directed healthcare and the shift from fee-based care to quality- and outcomes-based care has put more of an emphasis on health and wellness and care management. And in that atmosphere, telehealth fits the mold.

Reimbursement for Medicaid covered services, including those with telemedicine applications, must satisfy federal requirements of efficiency, economy and quality of care. States are encouraged to use the flexibility inherent in federal law to create innovative payment methodologies for services that incorporate telemedicine technology. For example, states may reimburse the physician or other licensed practitioner at the distant site and reimburse a facility fee to the originating site. States can also reimburse any additional costs such as technical support, transmission charges, and equipment. These add-on costs can be incorporated into the fee-for-service rates or separately reimbursed as an administrative cost by the state. If they are separately billed and reimbursed, the costs must be linked to a covered Medicaid service.


Patient Exam Cameras – These cameras are used to examine the patient’s overall condition. The different types of patient exam cameras are handheld cameras, camcorders, gooseneck cameras and those which may be placed above the set-top units. Analog and digital cameras are available and the ones that should be used depend on the connection to the set-top unit.

If you’re not ready to make the jump to do a televisit with Statcare’s doctor on call, you can still visit one of our urgent care locations to get the same excellent care. We have locations in Brooklyn, Hicksville, The Bronx and Astoria where we welcome walk-ins seven days a week, 365 days a year. Statcare urgent care is the only walk-in urgent care to have earned The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval in 2012 and have worked to maintain the excellence you’ve come to expect over the years. Read more about our locations, our services and how you can contact us here.
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