In the early days of telemedicine, health professionals used the burgeoning technology as a way to reach patients living in rural areas. However, the technology quickly expanded into urban areas, especially those that suffered from healthcare shortages. In 1967, physicians at the University of Miami School of Medicine and Miami's Fire Department transmitted electrocardiographic rhythms over existing voice radio channels from fire-rescue units to the city's Jackson Memorial Hospital.

Sometimes the answer to the question “What is telemedicine?” is simply mobile medicine. It doesn’t require a heavy desktop computer or a lot of equipment. Activities that used to happen only in person are now easy to do on a smartphone. Modern consumers are accustomed to downloading apps and using their smartphones for simple transactions. The same is true for doctor visits. For example, with MDLIVE the patient simply opens the app and clicks to choose a doctor, with whom they can speak either by phone, instant message, or video.    

Teladoc provides access to board-certified, state-licensed physicians 24 hours a day for non-emergency medical issues such as allergies, bronchitis, pink eye, sinus problems, and ear infection via audio-video technology for consultations regarding medical advice, diagnoses and basic prescription medications.[2] The company bills itself as a telehealth provider due to its function of facilitating "remote house calls by primary care doctors". However, United States Department of Health and Human Services states that the term telehealth covers a broader range including "non-clinical services, such as provider training, administrative meetings, and continuing medical education" and that the term telemedicine means "remote clinical services".[3] Its competitors include PlushCare,[4] American Well, MDLIVE Inc., Doctor On Demand, and Carena.[5][6]

Remote patient monitoring, which is sometimes called self-monitoring or self-testing, is a means of monitoring patient health and clinical information at a distance. It helps to simplify patient compliance with testing and it lowers the cost of frequent monitoring. It is frequently used in the treatment and management of chronic illnesses like asthma, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.
^ Wadsworth, Hannah E; Galusha-Glasscock, Jeanine M; Womack, Kyle B; Quiceno, Mary; Weiner, Myron F; Hynan, Linda S; Shore, Jay; Cullum, C. Munro (2016). "Remote Neuropsychological Assessment in Rural American Indians with and without Cognitive Impairment". Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology. 31 (5): 420. doi:10.1093/arclin/acw030. PMID 27246957.
The benefits posed by telehealth challenge the normative means of healthcare delivery set in both legislation and practice. Therefore, the growing prominence of telehealth is starting to underscore the need for updated regulations, guidelines and legislation which reflect the current and future trends of healthcare practices.[2][23] Telehealth enables timely and flexible care to patients wherever they may be; although this is a benefit, it also poses threats to privacy, safety, medical licensing and reimbursement. When a clinician and patient are in different locations, it is difficult to determine which laws apply to the context.[41] Once healthcare crosses borders different state bodies are involved in order to regulate and maintain the level of care that is warranted to the patient or telehealth consumer. As it stands, telehealth is complex with many grey areas when put into practice especially as it crosses borders. This effectively limits the potential benefits of telehealth.[2][23]
Since the internet and mobile devices now pervade our lives, it is natural that people want to leverage telehealth technologies to improve care, offer convenience, promote access, and support sustainability. Telehealth services range from consultations and video conference mental health sessions to public health broadcast text messaging and on-demand provider education.

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However, coverage, payment and other policy issues prevent full use of telehealth, remote patient monitoring and similar technologies. Medicare policy is particularly challenging, as it limits the geographic and practice settings where beneficiaries may receive services, as well as the types of services that may be provided via telehealth and the types of technology that may be used. Access to broadband services and state-level policy issues, such as licensure, also limit the ability to use telehealth.
We make any additions or deletions to the services defined as Medicare telehealth services effective on a January 1st basis. The annual physician fee schedule proposed rule published in the summer and the final rule (published by November 1) is used as the vehicle to make these changes. The public has the opportunity to submit requests to add or delete services on an ongoing basis.
Informed consent is another issue – should the patient give informed consent to receive online care before it starts? Or will it be implied if it is care that can only practically be given over distance? When telehealth includes the possibility for technical problems such as transmission errors or security breaches or storage which impact on ability to communicate, it may be wise to obtain informed consent in person first, as well as having backup options for when technical issues occur. In person, a patient can see who is involved in their care (namely themselves and their clinician in a consult), but online there will be other involved such as the technology providers, therefore consent may need to involve disclosure of anyone involved in the transmission of the information and the security that will keep their information private, and any legal malpractice cases may need to involve all of those involved as opposed to what would usually just be the practitioner.[22][42][43]
For developing countries, telemedicine and eHealth can be the only means of healthcare provision in remote areas. For example, the difficult financial situation in many African states and lack of trained health professionals has meant that the majority of the people in sub-Saharan Africa are badly disadvantaged in medical care, and in remote areas with low population density, direct healthcare provision is often very poor[90] However, provision of telemedicine and eHealth from urban centres or from other countries is hampered by the lack of communications infrastructure, with no landline phone or broadband internet connection, little or no mobile connectivity, and often not even a reliable electricity supply.[91]
^ Parikh, Mili; Grosch, Maria C; Graham, Lara L; Hynan, Linda S; Weiner, Myron; Shore, James H; Cullum, C. Munro (2013). "Consumer Acceptability of Brief Videoconference-based Neuropsychological Assessment in Older Individuals with and without Cognitive Impairment". The Clinical Neuropsychologist. 27 (5): 808–17. doi:10.1080/13854046.2013.791723. PMC 3692573. PMID 23607729.
The population of the United States is growing, aging, and becoming more prone to chronic conditions like diabetes, congestive heart failure, and COPD. This is creating a perfect storm of demand on the healthcare system, yet there is a shortage in the pipeline of healthcare providers being educated, trained, and licensed to practice. This necessitates getting very smart about how healthcare resources are leveraged to provide high-quality care to the highest number of people possible.  Telehealth technologies increase the efficiency of the healthcare system overall by maximizing the productivity of each provider and removing geographical barriers to care.
"Unless you plan to stay away from other people and public places during this time of year, the flu shot is your best form of protection from the flu,” Dr. Kristin Dean, associate medical director at @drondemand, tells @EliteDaily.https://www.elitedaily.com/p/are-flu-shots-really-necessary-more-people-are-opting-out-of-the-shot-survey-says-14706423 …

SSM Health telehealth programs use a variety of applications and services including two-way video, email, smart phones, wireless tools and other forms of telecommunications technology. These modern communication pipelines offer practitioners a channel to interact with the patient and exchange information, pictures and video. Our telehealth programs:


Doctor on Demand is a telemedicine service that gives you access to medical doctors 24/7/365 for the treatment of common and worrisome ailments such as urinary tract infections, skin and eye issues, and minor sports injuries. These problems can sometimes lead to trips to the emergency room simply because you cannot get to your doctor in a timely manner. With this service, you register, request a doctor and meet one quickly via your computer or smart device.


Interactive medicine, also known as “live telemedicine”, allows patients and physicians to communicate in real-time while also maintaining HIPAA compliance. Communication methods include both phone consultations and video conferences. Physicians can assess a patient’s medical history, perform psychiatric evaluations, and more using interactive medicine.
But getting doctors to jump on board is easier said than done, and takes time. Many are afraid of liability, as it's possible to miss something during a remote visit. And for years, it wasn't clear whether they would get paid as much as an in-person visit. Reimbursement questions are still getting resolved across different states, but most of the commercial and government plans are on board with the idea of telemedicine -- at least in specific circumstances.
We make any additions or deletions to the services defined as Medicare telehealth services effective on a January 1st basis. The annual physician fee schedule proposed rule published in the summer and the final rule (published by November 1) is used as the vehicle to make these changes. The public has the opportunity to submit requests to add or delete services on an ongoing basis.

The population of the United States is growing, aging, and becoming more prone to chronic conditions like diabetes, congestive heart failure, and COPD. This is creating a perfect storm of demand on the healthcare system, yet there is a shortage in the pipeline of healthcare providers being educated, trained, and licensed to practice. This necessitates getting very smart about how healthcare resources are leveraged to provide high-quality care to the highest number of people possible.  Telehealth technologies increase the efficiency of the healthcare system overall by maximizing the productivity of each provider and removing geographical barriers to care.
Erin Aas has worked in primary care since 2005 and provided virtual care since 2012. Since receiving his Master of Nursing from Seattle University, he has provided comprehensive primary healthcare and promoted cultural competency in a variety of community health settings. In addition to his full-time work in virtual care, he works shifts in a local Emergency Department. He is proficient in conversational and medical Spanish. Outside of work, he is an accomplished guitarist, choral composer and Ironman triathlete.
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