This service removes the need for impromptu walk-in clinic visits, lengthy waiting room stays, and long lines at the pharmacy. It also creates a safe space without judgment or the need to explain your condition to multiple strangers before you receive a prescription. Our professional and experienced team takes great care to make you feel comfortable and protected as your medical needs are met and your prescription is written, sent, and filled.

Without proper medication, asthma and other respiratory related illnesses can be extremely serious. Chronic asthma affects more than 20-million citizens across the United States, and can appear in early childhood or adolescence. The symptoms vary from person to person, with most individuals experiencing shortness of breath, tightening of the chest, coughing, and wheezing.

Each online video chat appointment with a doctor costs patients $40; doctors get $30 of that, with the company taking a $10 cut. Doctors can diagnose illnesses and prescribe medication, but the app and website are not recommended for any patient experiencing a potentially life-threatening emergency medical condition. Doctors also cannot use it to prescribe medications like sedatives and narcotics.
The Satellite African eHEalth vaLidation (SAHEL) demonstration project has shown how satellite broadband technology can be used to establish telemedicine in such areas. SAHEL was started in 2010 in Kenya and Senegal, providing self-contained, solar-powered internet terminals to rural villages for use by community nurses for collaboration with distant health centres for training, diagnosis and advice on local health issues[92]
In the United States, the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research's (NIDRR)[38] supports research and the development of telerehabilitation. NIDRR's grantees include the "Rehabilitation Engineering and Research Center" (RERC) at the University of Pittsburgh, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the State University of New York at Buffalo, and the National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington DC. Other federal funders of research are the Veterans Health Administration, the Health Services Research Administration in the US Department of Health and Human Services, and the Department of Defense.[39] Outside the United States, excellent research is conducted in Australia and Europe.
Dr. Mercado has practiced medicine since 2000, and provided virtual care since 2015. She earned her medical degree at the University of the Philippines in Manila. She completed her Family Medicine Residency at Akron General Medical Center in Ohio, where she was the chief resident during her final year of residency. She has spent the last six working in a primary care setting where she saw patients of all ages. Dr. Mercado believes communication is an integral part of a physician-patient interaction. During her free time, she enjoys reading, traveling, watching movies, volunteering, and spending time with her family.
As of 2015, Teladoc was the only telemedicine company to be publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange. In December 2016, the American Hospital Association exclusively endorsed Teladoc's telehealth technology platform. Teladoc now operates its full suite of services 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, by web, phone, or mobile app in 48 of the 50 states.[7]
In-office visits and overnight stays at healthcare facilities can be difficult for individuals in poor health. Telehealth services reduce hospital readmission rates by enabling doctors to monitor patients outside the office. Because of this, many hospitals have already started to include some form of remote monitoring as part of their post-discharge plans. By equipping patients with wearable devices or other wireless technologies, clinicians can monitor vital signs and symptoms and adjust care as needed without an in-office visit. Alignment Healthcare, for example, developed a program to remotely monitor chronically ill and recently discharged patients and reduce 30-day readmission rates. Enrollees were given a package of Bluetooth-enabled monitoring equipment, including a Samsung tablet, blood pressure cuff, pulse oximeter and scale.
The United States has 14 Telehealth Resource Centers, all funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Office for the Advancement of Telehealth. These resource centers serve as a local hub of information and research about telehealth, usually with a focus on increasing healthcare access for underserved communities. Plus, the services they provide are generally free!
“Telemedicine is not a separate medical specialty,” the organization continues. “Products and services related to telemedicine are often part of a larger investment by healthcare institutions in either information technology or the delivery of clinical care. Even in the reimbursement fee structure, there is usually no distinction made between services provided on site and those provided through telemedicine and often no separate coding required for billing of remote services. ATA has historically considered telemedicine and telehealth to be interchangeable terms, encompassing a wide definition of remote healthcare. Patient consultations via video conferencing, transmission of still images, e-health including patient portals, remote monitoring of vital signs, continuing medical education, consumer-focused wireless applications and nursing call centers, among other applications, are all considered part of telemedicine and telehealth.”
For developing countries, telemedicine and eHealth can be the only means of healthcare provision in remote areas. For example, the difficult financial situation in many African states and lack of trained health professionals has meant that the majority of the people in sub-Saharan Africa are badly disadvantaged in medical care, and in remote areas with low population density, direct healthcare provision is often very poor[90] However, provision of telemedicine and eHealth from urban centres or from other countries is hampered by the lack of communications infrastructure, with no landline phone or broadband internet connection, little or no mobile connectivity, and often not even a reliable electricity supply.[91]
Jamee has provided care since 2002, and provided virtual care since 2015. She received her Bachelor and Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Texas in Houston. Jamee has spent the majority of her nursing career with a focus in emergency and urgent care, transitioning her focus to Family Practice in 2014. She recently relocated to the Northwest from Dallas with her husband and five children. She enjoys reading, crafts, cooking and camping.
While many branches of medicine have wanted to fully embrace telehealth for a long time, there are certain risks and barriers which bar the full amalgamation of telehealth into best practice. For a start, it is dubious as to whether a practitioner can fully leave the "hands-on" experience behind.[23] Although it is predicted that telehealth will replace many consultations and other health interactions, it cannot yet fully replace a physical examination, this is particularly so in diagnostics, rehabilitation or mental health.[23]
The complex US health care system is under a tremendous amount of pressure. Many traditional health care business models are designed to allow high-volume, low-cost procedures to offset the costs of low- volume, high-cost procedures. An upward shift in the aging population is projected to result in a large increase in demand for health care, and new legislation such as the Affordable Care Act has added uncertainty to the future of health care business models and payment. Telehealth is projected to grow worldwide to 1.8 million users by 2017, according to the World Market of Telehealth.
Because of telemedicine, patients who previously had limited access to health care services can now see a physician without leaving their home. Seniors who would prefer to age in place can now do so with the use of medical streaming devices. The spread of disease is reduced as individuals with contagious diseases don’t have to expose it to others in crowded waiting rooms.
On July 7th, 2015, House representatives introduced the Medicare Telehealth Parity Act of 2015. If passed, the bill will expand what telemedicine services Medicare will cover and get rid of many limitations (like the requirements for what qualifies as an “originating site“). Legislation like this one could have a huge impact on coverage for remote patient monitoring and other telemedicine services delivered to the patient in their own home.
Telemedicine is an important and quickly growing component of healthcare delievery in the United States.  There are currently about 200 telemedicine networks, with 3,500 service sites in the US.  In 2011 alone the Veterans Health Administration delivered over 300,000 remote consultations using telemedicine. More than half of all U.S. hospitals now use some form of telemedicine.
The definition of telemedicine is somewhat controversial. Some definitions (such as the definition given by the World Health Organization[2]) include all aspects of healthcare including preventive care. The American Telemedicine Association uses the terms telemedicine and telehealth interchangeably, although it acknowledges that telehealth is sometimes used more broadly for remote health not involving active clinical treatments.[3]

Teladoc does not guarantee prescriptions. It is up to the doctor to recommend the best treatment. Teladoc doctors do not issue prescriptions for substances controlled by the DEA, non-therapeutic, and/or certain other drugs which may be harmful because of their potential for abuse. Also, non-therapeutic drugs such as Viagra and Cialis are not prescribed by Teladoc doctors.
Brenda Stavish has practiced medicine since 1987 and provided virtual care since 2014. In 2006, she received her Master of Nursing from Seattle Pacific University. Over the course of her career, she has worked in women's health clinics, school districts, and primary/chronic care settings. She believes in patient care that brings together the health of the mind, body, and spirit, equally. In her spare time she enjoys travel, wine tasting and cooking.
Based on over 600 studies, the AMA has put together a comprehensive set of guidelines for professionals using telemedicine in primary and urgent care – a field that is quickly adopting telemedicine to expand basic healthcare access. Here are some of the basic protocols and rules a primary care or urgent care facility should put into place when starting their telemedicine program.
Sharla Peterson has worked in primary care since 2007 and provided virtual care since 2011. She received her Master of Nursing from Washington State University. In addition to her career in telemedicine, she works part-time in a plastic surgery office and volunteers at a free clinic near her home. She serves as Medical Director for local Camporee events with the Boy Scouts of America and works with youth in her church. When she is not working, she enjoys cooking, family time and outdoor adventures of all kinds.

Symptoms occur due to a swelling of the breathing tubes, which makes it difficult for air to pass into the lungs. For those who smoke cigarettes, suffer from obesity, or live with allergies, these symptoms are more severe. By speaking with a U.S. doctor through your consultation, you can receive a prescription for the proper medication to treat asthma. To treat your symptoms,click herefor more information! .
Teladoc does not guarantee prescriptions. It is up to the doctor to recommend the best treatment. Teladoc doctors do not issue prescriptions for substances controlled by the DEA, non-therapeutic, and/or certain other drugs which may be harmful because of their potential for abuse. Also, non-therapeutic drugs such as Viagra and Cialis are not prescribed by Teladoc doctors.
Up until 2013, hospitals were required to staff their EDs with a physician 24 hours a day, either on site or on call. In 2013, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services adjusted that requirement to allow rural hospitals to use advanced practice providers, such as a physician assistants and nurse practitioners, as long as physicians could be summoned via telemedicine in an emergency.
Symptoms occur due to a swelling of the breathing tubes, which makes it difficult for air to pass into the lungs. For those who smoke cigarettes, suffer from obesity, or live with allergies, these symptoms are more severe. By speaking with a U.S. doctor through your consultation, you can receive a prescription for the proper medication to treat asthma. To treat your symptoms,click herefor more information! .
HIT is the generation and transmission of digital health data, often through an electronic health record. Generally, HIT is used for administrative functions (keeping track of patient's health history, sharing information between providers, etc.) while telemedicine is the delivery of an actual clinical service. HIT can facilitate telemedicine but it is not a requirement for delivering remote health care.
Telemedicine solutions that fall into the remote patient monitoring (RPM) allow healthcare providers to track a patient’s vital signs and other health data from a distance. This makes it easy to watch for warning signs and quickly intervene in patients who are at health-risk or are recovering from a recent surgery, for example. This type of telemedicine is sometimes also called telemonitoring or home telehealth.
Patients often look for a quick and inexpensive second opinion from a specialist, after diagnosis of a medical condition. Telemedicine has stepped up, by providing solutions in this aspect as well. Companies and traditional healthcare services such as Partners Healthcare, 2nd.MD, DoctorSpring, and Cleaveland Clinic are providing quick and efficient second opinions using telehealth.
With telemedicine, physicians in other locations can provide assistance by conducting video visits. In fact, when Hurricane Harvey occurred in 2017, healthcare professionals provided emergency and behavioral health video visits. This allowed practitioners to focus on high demand, complex cases in-person versus low level cases that can managed remotely.
Jay McGraw and Adam Jackson, both 35, are changing the way that people interact with their doctors. Along with Dr. Phil, who is McGraw’s father, they launched Doctor On Demand in 2013. The San-Francisco-based startup offers online video consultations with 1,400 credentialed physicians around the country. One million people have downloaded the app -- and it’s raised $74 million in VC funding to date.
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