Symptoms occur due to a swelling of the breathing tubes, which makes it difficult for air to pass into the lungs. For those who smoke cigarettes, suffer from obesity, or live with allergies, these symptoms are more severe. By speaking with a U.S. doctor through your consultation, you can receive a prescription for the proper medication to treat asthma. To treat your symptoms,click herefor more information! .

Video chatting has become ubiquitous with technology advances such as 4G internet speeds, low-cost smartphones and standardized phone operating systems. The advent of additional technology standards such as interoperable electronic health records (EHR), secure cloud storage (HIPAA), and wearable health trackers that can communicate with the smartphone has further incentivized consumers to jump on to the telehealth bandwagon. Perhaps the ultimate goal of telehealth is to bring continuous care to consumers while they are working or at home, years before they end up in a clinic.
1. The doctor writes you a prescription. In-person, this can mean a handwritten prescription or a digital prescription sent directly to a pharmacy. Prescriptions can be sent to a retail pharmacy, mail-order pharmacy, or pharmacy inside your doctor’s office. Online doctors only have the digital option and will likely send the prescription to a retail pharmacy in your area.
The term ‘telehealth’ is gaining popularity among medical professionals, compared to the original term, ‘telemedicine.’ [4] Some medical professionals use the names interchangeably. However, telemedicine is a term that may apply to the application of any technology in the clinical setting, while telehealth more distinctly describes the delivery of services to patients. Telemedicine is a familiar term, but telehealth more appropriately describes the latest trends in using technology to deliver treatments to patients. Depending on the organization, service providers may use a different definitions of telehealth. Although the basic premise remains similar, the context may change according to factors such as organizational objectives, and the needs of the patient population being served. Medical experts do agree on one point; telehealth is an innovative way of engaging patients, and it is highly beneficial for both providers and patients.

In 1967 one of the first telemedicine clinics was founded by Kenneth Bird at Massachusetts General Hospital. The clinic addressed the fundamental problem of delivering occupational and emergency health services to employees and travellers at Boston's Logan International Airport, located three congested miles from the hospital. Over 1,000 patients are documented as having received remote treatment from doctors at MGH using the clinic's two-way audiovisual microwave circuit.[13] The timing of Bird's clinic more or less coincided with NASA's foray into telemedicine through the use of physiologic monitors for astronauts.[14] Other pioneering programs in telemedicine were designed to deliver healthcare services to people in rural settings.[citation needed] The first interactive telemedicine system, operating over standard telephone lines, designed to remotely diagnose and treat patients requiring cardiac resuscitation (defibrillation) was developed and launched by an American company, MedPhone Corporation, in 1989. A year later under the leadership of its President/CEO S Eric Wachtel, MedPhone introduced a mobile cellular version, the MDPhone. Twelve hospitals in the U.S. served as receiving and treatment centers.[15]
RPM telemedicine is quickly rising in popularity as more health professionals realize its potential effects on chronic care management. For instance, a patient with diabetes who has a glucose tracker in their home can measure their glucose levels at regular intervals and transmit them to their doctor. If all is well, those results are simply recorded. If something looks off, the physician may flag it and call in the patient for a consult.

Telehealth is defined as the delivery and facilitation of health and health-related services including medical care, provider and patient education, health information services, and self-care via telecommunications and digital communication technologies. Live video conferencing, mobile health apps, “store and forward” electronic transmission, and remote patient monitoring (RPM) are examples of technologies used in telehealth.

We consider ourselves part of YOUR healthcare team. Our physicians do not take over your patients’ care but serve as a knowledgeable consultant for the attending physician. Through HD video conferencing, our team can speak with patients and assess their condition. Our services can also help your facility meet requirements for CMS and Joint Commission certifications.
Those in the healthcare industry recognize that medication management is a big deal, especially among seniors. Older adults are more likely to forget to take their medications, which is where telemedicine comes in. Providers and other healthcare professionals can use telemedicine technology to monitor when and if their patients took their medicine. As a result, this leads to fewer hospital readmissions and enhances medication compliance.

Without a doubt, the emergency room is one of the most expensive, overcrowded, and stressful environments in healthcare. With telemedicine, overcrowded emergency rooms can be reduced by having patients see a remote physician using video chat first. The remote physician can determine if that individual should seek care in an emergency department, which increases ED efficiency.
Telemedicine is an important and quickly growing component of healthcare delievery in the United States.  There are currently about 200 telemedicine networks, with 3,500 service sites in the US.  In 2011 alone the Veterans Health Administration delivered over 300,000 remote consultations using telemedicine. More than half of all U.S. hospitals now use some form of telemedicine.
Dr. Bernstein has practiced medicine since 1990 and provided virtual care with our team since 2006. He received his medical degree from the University of North Carolina and completed a residency at Providence Family Practice in Seattle. He also holds a Master's Degree in Public Health from the University of Washington. Dr. Bernstein is dedicated to quality preventive medicine, public health promotion, and research. As Director of Clinical Quality, he manages the development and maintenance of the clinical standards of patient care, working with the development team to create new systems for measuring clinical delivery effectiveness. In his spare time, he is an avid cyclist and a soccer fan.
The first radiologic images were sent via telephone between two medical staff at two different health centers in Pennsylvania by 1948. The health centers were 24 miles apart from one another! Then in 1959, physicians at the University of Nebraska transmitted neurological examinations across campus to medical students using two-way interactive television. Five years later, a closed-circuit television link was built that allowed physicians to provide psychiatric consultations 112 miles away at Norfolk State Hospital.
Application Service Provider (ASP): Various applications are hosted by an ASP on a central server. Customers can pay a fee to access the applications they want to use over either a private network or secure Internet connection. This allows customers to rent applications that they need to use from an ASP instead of having to buy, install and then maintain software on their own. Usually software upgrades and new releases are included in the rental price.
Remote patient monitoring, which is sometimes called self-monitoring or self-testing, is a means of monitoring patient health and clinical information at a distance. It helps to simplify patient compliance with testing and it lowers the cost of frequent monitoring. It is frequently used in the treatment and management of chronic illnesses like asthma, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

“If there are areas of clinical need across the healthcare network, telemedicine may allow for better leveraging and expanding access to sub-specialists,” Sokolovich said. “Another opportunity could include better triaging patients through telemedicine-enabled provider-to-provider or provider-to-patient evaluations, which bring together experts who can quickly assess the best care path and eliminate unnecessary hospital admissions or emergency department visits.”


Healthcare systems, physician practices, and skilled nursing facilities are using telemedicine to provide care more efficiently. Technologies that comes integrated with telemedicine software like electronic medical records, AI diagnosis and medical streaming devices, can better assist providers in diagnosis and treatment. The latter allows providers to monitor patients in real-time and adjust treatment plans when necessary. Ultimately, this leads to better patient outcomes.
Telepathology is the practice of pathology at a distance. It uses telecommunications technology to facilitate the transfer of image-rich pathology data between distant locations for the purposes of diagnosis, education, and research.[63][64] Performance of telepathology requires that a pathologist selects the video images for analysis and the rendering diagnoses. The use of "television microscopy", the forerunner of telepathology, did not require that a pathologist have physical or virtual "hands-on" involvement is the selection of microscopic fields-of-view for analysis and diagnosis.

The amount providers are reimbursed for telemedicine will vary depending on a state’s legislation. Some states specifically mandate that private payers reimburse the same amount for telemedicine as if the service was provided in-person. However, most states with reimbursement mandates leave this determination up to the payers. We have found the majority of private payers still reimburse at levels equivalent to in-person visits.


Doctor On Demand’s board-certified physicians are available on-demand and by appointment. The typical average wait time to connect with a doctor is under 3 minutes. Doctor On Demand psychologists are available by appointment between the hours of 7am and 10pm and have extensive experience coaching patients through natural disasters and traumatic events.
The laws regarding reimbursements change regularly as more service providers incorporate telehealth technology into their practices. Reimbursement procedures can vary by state, practice, insurer, and service. [3] Care providers need to understand several facts, regulations, and laws to navigate Medicare telehealth reimbursements. They must first scrutinize whether the distance between the facility (the originating site) and the patient is far enough to qualify as a distant site. The location must also qualify as a Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) per Medicare guidelines. Additionally, the originating site must fall under Medicare’s classification as a legally authorized private practice, hospital, or critical access hospital (CAH). For instance, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ranks the Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center as a top facility in need of physician services based on these criteria. Care providers must also use proper insurance coding to be reimbursed for hosting services that use telehealth technologies. For now, collecting reimbursements for telehealth services remains simpler for practitioners who limit the scope to which they apply the technology.
Telemedicine for intensive care unit (ICU) rounds: Telemedicine is also being used in some trauma ICUs to reduce the spread of infections. Rounds are usually conducted at hospitals across the country by a team of approximately ten or more people to include attending physicians, fellows, residents and other clinicians. This group usually moves from bed to bed in a unit discussing each patient. This aids in the transition of care for patients from the night shift to the morning shift, but also serves as an educational experience for new residents to the team. A new approach features the team conducting rounds from a conference room using a video-conferencing system. The trauma attending, residents, fellows, nurses, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists are able to watch a live video stream from the patient's bedside. They can see the vital signs on the monitor, view the settings on the respiratory ventilator, and/or view the patient's wounds. Video-conferencing allows the remote viewers two-way communication with clinicians at the bedside.[42]
Teladoc Health enjoys a killer advantage with its head start in telehealth. Around 40% of the largest companies in the world contract with Teladoc to provide virtual healthcare services to their employees. Over 35 of the biggest health plans in the U.S. have partnered with Teladoc. More than 290 hospitals and health systems have teamed up with the telehealth leader.
Several decades later, in the 1950’s, a few hospital systems and university-based medical centers experimenting with how to put concept of telemedicine into practice. Medical staff at two different health centers in Pennsylvania about 24 miles apart transmitted radiologic images via telephone. In 1950’s, a Canadian doctor built upon this technology into a Teleradiology system that was used in and around Montreal. Then, in 1959, Doctors at the University of Nebraska were able to transmit neurological examinations to medical students across campus via a two-way interactive television. By 1964, they had built a telemedicine link that allowed them to provide health services at Norfolk State Hospital, 112 miles away from campus.

Teladoc Health enjoys a killer advantage with its head start in telehealth. Around 40% of the largest companies in the world contract with Teladoc to provide virtual healthcare services to their employees. Over 35 of the biggest health plans in the U.S. have partnered with Teladoc. More than 290 hospitals and health systems have teamed up with the telehealth leader.


Dr. Barnett attended the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine and completed his residency at Swedish Family Medicine. He has over 12 years of experience in practice and began working in Virtual Care over nine years ago. When Dr. Barnett is not providing Virtual Care, he works as a primary care provider for a local health system. He is fluent in Russian and proficient in Spanish. Outside of work, Dr. Barnett enjoys cooking, watching films, photography, and spending time with family.
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