Telemedicine for trauma triage: using telemedicine, trauma specialists can interact with personnel on the scene of a mass casualty or disaster situation, via the internet using mobile devices, to determine the severity of injuries. They can provide clinical assessments and determine whether those injured must be evacuated for necessary care. Remote trauma specialists can provide the same quality of clinical assessment and plan of care as a trauma specialist located physically with the patient.[41]
Today, 95 percent of Americans own cell phones and 77 percent own smartphones. These and other mobile devices can be leveraged to promote better health outcomes and increased access to care. mHealth or mobile health refers to healthcare applications and programs patients use on their smartphones, tablets, or laptops. These applications allow patients to track health measurements, set medication and appointment reminders, and share information with clinicians. Users can access hundreds of mHealth applications including asthma and diabetes management tools as well as weight loss or smoking cessation apps. Additionally, mobile devices allow users to schedule appointments and communicate with providers via video conference and text message.
Facility Fees. In addition to reimbursement for the telemedicine service, Medicare will pay the originating site a facility fee. For example, if you’re a primary care provider with a patient in your office and you do a telemedicine visit to consult a physician in another location, you could bill for two separate things – the telemedicine service, and a facility fee for using your practice to “host” of the patient visit. Check HCPCS code Q3014 for a full description on facility fees.
Restrictive licensure laws in the United States require a practitioner to obtain a full license to deliver telemedicine care across state lines. Typically, states with restrictive licensure laws also have several exceptions (varying from state to state) that may release an out-of-state practitioner from the additional burden of obtaining such a license. A number of states require practitioners who seek compensation to frequently deliver interstate care to acquire a full license.

Patient Exam Cameras – These cameras are used to examine the patient’s overall condition. The different types of patient exam cameras are handheld cameras, camcorders, gooseneck cameras and those which may be placed above the set-top units. Analog and digital cameras are available and the ones that should be used depend on the connection to the set-top unit.

NewYork-Presbyterian is making investments in all of these because it believes telemedicine and virtual medicine in general will make delivery of care more efficient and higher-quality in the long run, he explained. Each telemedicine modality has its own associated cost and reimbursement, and the organization is making decisions on where to put its efforts not based on net revenue but on the impact that each will have for patients, he added.
Today’s patient lives in an increasingly connected world and expects a different kind of care experience. Telemedicine engages patients by allowing them to connect with their doctor more frequently, in a convenient way. That means more questions asked and answered, a stronger doctor-patient relationship, and patients who feel empowered to manage their care.

The future appears to be bright for virtual healthcare services. Patients like using the services because of the convenience. Payers like virtual healthcare because it lowers their costs. As overall healthcare costs increase with more older individuals across the world, telehealth should experience even more growth as a way to control costs without angering patients. 

Like most technology solutions, telemedicine platforms usually require some training and equipment purchases. How much is really dependent on the solution – a more extensive inpatient telemedicine platform that will be used between primary doctors and consulting specialist may require more training and the purchase of a telemedicine cart and various mobile health devices. A secure videochat app like eVisit, requires much less staff training and usually only requires purchase of a webcam.
Once the need for a Telehealth service is established, delivery can come within four distinct domains. They are live video (synchronous), store-and-forward (asynchronous), remote patient monitoring, and mobile health. Live video involves a real-time two-way interaction, such as patient/caregiver-provider or provider-provider, over a digital (i.e. broadband) connection. This often is used to substitute a face to face meeting such as consults, and saves time and cost in travel. Store-and-forward is when data is collected, recorded, and then sent on to a provider.[1][2][10] For example, a patient's' digital health history file including x-rays and notes, being securely transmitted electronically to evaluate the current case. Remote patient monitoring includes patients' medical and health data being collected and transferred to a provider elsewhere who can continue to monitor the data and any changes that may occur. This may best suit cases that require ongoing care such as rehabilitation, chronic care, or elderly clients trying to stay in the community in their own homes as opposed to a care facility. Mobile health includes any health information, such as education, monitoring and care, that is present on and supported by mobile communication devices such as cell phones or tablet computers. This might include an application, or text messaging services like appointment reminders or public health warning systems.[10]
A native of rural Washington, Katie Gieseke has practiced medicine since 2009, and provided virtual care since 2015. She received her undergraduate degree in Nursing from the University of Portland and received her Doctorate of Nursing Practice and Family Nurse Practitioner certification from the University of Washington. Her nursing career ranges from experience in the emergency department to home health assessments. During her time in the emergency department, she became interested in improving the effectiveness, efficiency and continuity of the health care system. She has a strong interest in illness prevention and look forward to having the time to spend with patients providing education on maintaining wellness, disease prevention and motivating patients to take control of their health.
An example of these limitations include the current American reimbursement infrastructure, where Medicare will reimburse for telehealth services only when a patient is living in an area where specialists are in shortage, or in particular rural counties. The area is defined by whether it is a medical facility as opposed to a patient's' home. The site that the practitioner is in, however, is unrestricted. Medicare will only reimburse live video (synchronous) type services, not store-and-forward, mhealth or remote patient monitoring (if it does not involve live-video). Some insurers currently will reimburse telehealth, but not all yet. So providers and patients must go to the extra effort of finding the correct insurers before continuing. Again in America, states generally tend to require that clinicians are licensed to practice in the surgery' state, therefore they can only provide their service if licensed in an area that they do not live in themselves.[1]

Unfortunately, there is no medication which removes the chance of contagion, but through careful planning, proper protection, and prescription medication men and women are able to live life normally once again. Prescriptions for Acyclovir and Valtrex can help to keep the virus from spreading or multiplying. Topical creams, and over the counter pain medication can also be used for the redness and discomfort associated with the illness.
There are currently two major ways you can access remote care from your home: through e-visits with your own provider (if they’re offered) or through a consult with an online-only service, such as Teladoc. This could be as simple as talking to your doctor over the phone or using the Teladoc app to video chat with a doctor, nurse practitioner, or other provider who can write a prescription.
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