A sexually transmitted illness, which affects men and women of all ages, herpes is embarrassing to deal with. Whether in the form of a cold sore on your mouth, or a rash on your genitals, discomfort and unease is sure to follow. While there is no cure for Herpes at this time, there are several treatment options which have been made available across the United States.

Telehealth is defined as the delivery and facilitation of health and health-related services including medical care, provider and patient education, health information services, and self-care via telecommunications and digital communication technologies. Live video conferencing, mobile health apps, “store and forward” electronic transmission, and remote patient monitoring (RPM) are examples of technologies used in telehealth.
Unfortunately, there is no medication which removes the chance of contagion, but through careful planning, proper protection, and prescription medication men and women are able to live life normally once again. Prescriptions for Acyclovir and Valtrex can help to keep the virus from spreading or multiplying. Topical creams, and over the counter pain medication can also be used for the redness and discomfort associated with the illness.
One especially successful telemedicine project funded by the government was called the Space Technology Applied to Rural Papago Advanced Health Care (STARPAHC), and was a partnership between NASA and the Indian Health Services. The program funded remote medical services to Native Americans living on the Papago Reservation in Arizona and astronauts in space! Projects like STARPAHC drove research in medical engineering, and helped expand advancements in telemedicine. The next few decades saw continued innovations in telemedicine and wider research at universities, medical centers and research companies.
The content on this website is made available for educational purposes only, and is not to be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. To get a medical diagnosis for your condition, book an appointment with a PlushCare doctor or your own primary care physician. This blog and all contents herein are the intellectual property of PlushCare and may not be used or copied without written permission.
From the late 1800s to the early 1900s the early foundations of wireless communication were laid down.[5] Radios provided an easier and near instantaneous form of communication. The use of radio to deliver healthcare became accepted for remote areas.[5][8] The Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia is an example of the early adoption of radios in telehealth.[6]
If the state decides to cover telemedicine, but does not cover certain practitioners/providers of telemedicine or its telemedicine coverage is limited to certain parts of the state, then the state is responsible for assuring access and covering face-to-face visits/examinations by these "recognized" practitioners/providers in those parts of the state where telemedicine is not available.

Healthcare systems, policymakers, vendors, and providers alike can attest to the many gray areas within telemedicine. One particular area that requires more clarity is the legalities surrounding telemedicine. With it being an industry that is constantly growing, it has become difficult to create a concrete solution. In addition, each state follows different laws for telemedicine, which makes it increasingly difficult to keep up with it.


Today's high-speed broadband based Internet enables the use of new technologies for teleradiology: the image reviewer can now have access to distant servers in order to view an exam. Therefore, they do not need particular workstations to view the images; a standard personal computer (PC) and digital subscriber line (DSL) connection is enough to reach keosys central server. No particular software is necessary on the PC and the images can be reached from wherever in the world.
Telehealth is defined as the use of electronic information and telecommunication technologies to support and promote long-distance clinical health care, patient and professional health-related education, public health and health administration. Technologies include video conferencing, the internet, store-and-forward imaging, streaming media, and terrestrial and wireless communications.

To guide these decisions, the provider should create clinical protocols which include the condition to be treated (with ICD code), scope of that condition that can be treated using telemedicine, guidelines required to diagnose (when is telephone sufficient, vs. live video), documentation needed to properly assess the patient’s condition, parameters for when the condition can be treated and cannot be treated, and guidelines for when prescription can be done. While this section provides basic, overall guidelines for practicing telemedicine, it’s best practices for the healthcare provider to create more detailed protocols for each condition they intend to treat.
Store-and-forward telemedicine is a great way to increase healthcare efficiency since a provider, patient, and specialist don’t need to be in the same place, at the same time. It also facilitates faster diagnosis, especially for patients located in underserved settings that may not have the necessary specialist on staff. Overall, this adds up to lower patient wait times, more accessible healthcare, better patient outcomes, and a more optimized schedule for physicians.
Since the internet and mobile devices now pervade our lives, it is natural that people want to leverage telehealth technologies to improve care, offer convenience, promote access, and support sustainability. Telehealth services range from consultations and video conference mental health sessions to public health broadcast text messaging and on-demand provider education.

Mobile Telehealth Clinic – This involves using vehicles like van, trailer or any mobile unit to provide health care services for patients. The services are given by health care professionals. This is helpful to those who are living on areas far from the hospital. Some mobile units are equipped with medical technologies that are found in the hospital like mobile CT, MRI and TeleDentistry.
A radiologist specializes in using medical imaging techniques to both diagnose and treat disease. Their day-to-day responsibilities include working with other healthcare professionals, which can be extremely time-consuming. With telemedicine, radiologists can receive high-quality images and provide feedback on where ever they are. They no longer have to be in the same area as the provider sending over the images, which allows for a more streamlined process.

This isn't to say that you should jump right in and begin providing services via telehealth. You'll first need to consider federal and state legislation and regulations that govern your practice, risk management implications, billing and coding issues, and hardware/software requirements. The resources below aren't meant to give you detailed instructions on developing and using telehealth in your practice, but they identify areas most important for you to investigate and consider.


Visit Teladoc and set up an account using the information provided on your GuideStone/Highmark BCBS ID card. You'll also complete a medical history so that it's easy for the Teladoc physician to access when providing treatment. Or you can set up your account and provide your medical history by calling 1-800-TELADOC (1-800-835-2362). If they ask for your employer's name, be sure to tell them your coverage is provided through GuideStone/Highmark BCBS and provide the identification information from your ID card. Learn more about How to Register.

The complex US health care system is under a tremendous amount of pressure. Many traditional health care business models are designed to allow high-volume, low-cost procedures to offset the costs of low- volume, high-cost procedures. An upward shift in the aging population is projected to result in a large increase in demand for health care, and new legislation such as the Affordable Care Act has added uncertainty to the future of health care business models and payment. Telehealth is projected to grow worldwide to 1.8 million users by 2017, according to the World Market of Telehealth.


Medicare: Yes... in certain circumstances.  Many “telehealth” services, such as remote radiology, pathology and some cardiology, are covered simply as "physician services."  For traditional fee-for-service beneficiaries living in rural areas, Medicare covers physician services using videoconferencing and remote patient monitoring. The ~14 million beneficiaries in Medicare Advantage (managed care) plans, have complete flexibility in using telehealth, as long as their provider offers the service.  ATA is pushing the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, and Congress to removing the arbitrary restrictions that limit telehealth coverage, so that all beneficiaries can get this great benefit.  The ATA Wiki has details explaining coverage details in Medicare. 
All the doctors in Teladoc's national network are U.S. board-certified family practitioners, primary care physicians, pediatricians and internists who use Electronic Health Records to diagnose, treat and write prescriptions when necessary. When accessing Teladoc, you'll be connected to a doctor in your state. These doctors are all actively practicing physicians and choose to incorporate telemedicine into their medical practice as a way to offer more affordable, convenient access to quality care.
According to an SEC filing relating to its recent fundraising round, Teladoc brings in between $25 million and $100 million in sales. The company is also experimenting with taking a cut of the cost savings it delivers to health plans, which could boost revenue further. Revenue grew 75% in 2012, 100% in 2013 and is expected to grow another 100% this year, Gorevic says.
Teleophthalmology is a branch of telemedicine that delivers eye care through digital medical equipment and telecommunications technology. Today, applications of teleophthalmology encompass access to eye specialists for patients in remote areas, ophthalmic disease screening, diagnosis and monitoring; as well as distant learning. Teleophthalmology may help reduce disparities by providing remote, low-cost screening tests such as diabetic retinopathy screening to low-income and uninsured patients.[75][76] In Mizoram, India, a hilly area with poor roads, between 2011 till 2015, Tele-ophthalmology has provided care to over 10000 patients. These patients were examined by ophthalmic assistants locally but surgery was done on appointment after viewing the patient images online by Eye Surgeons in the hospital 6–12 hours away. Instead of an average 5 trips for say, a cataract procedure, only one was required for surgery alone as even post op care like stitch removal and glasses was done locally. There were huge cost savings in travel etc.[77]
In an increasingly crowded field, the start-up is undercutting the competition with its $40 fee. American Well, which provides its technology to WellPoint , charges $49 for online visits, so does MDLive. Better offers access to a personal health assistant for $49 a month, and HealthTap recently announced it will facilitate medical consultations for $99 a month. Jackson also says that his company charges corporations $40 when the service is used, as opposed to the industry practice of charging per employee per month.
Home Health Care And Remote Monitoring Systems: Care that is provided to patients and their families in their residences to promote, maintain or restore health; or to minimize the effects of illness and disability, including terminal illnesses. In Medicare enrollment data and claims as well a Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, home health care is defined as home visits made by professionals, including physicians, nurses, home health aides, therapist and social workers. The use of interactive devices and remote monitoring enable a patient’s vital signs to be sent on a regular basis to health care providers without the patient having to travel.
Thanks to telemedicine programs, hospitals, clinics and all other health facilities can ensure that patients receive the best care possible when that care is in their hometown or even hundred of miles away. So what is telehealth’s role in this? It can play a major role in addressing some of the upcoming challenges for healthcare in the United States. For instance, the population growth from 2008-2030 is set at 20%, that is 363 million people, which is predicted to bring about a shortage of healthcare professionals and the lack of specialists and medical facilities in rural areas. Additionally, there is an expected increase in chronic diseases such as diabetes, congestive heart failure, and obstructive pulmonary disease. Statistics indicates that almost 5 million patients are admitted to the intensive care unit that accounts for 20% of the hospital’s operating budgets. Telemedicine can reduce the impact of such challenges by connecting the right people with the correct resources and expertise in real-time.
Telemedicine is a significant and rapidly growing component of health care in the United States.  There are currently about 200 telemedicine networks, with 3,500 service sites in the US. Nearly 1 million Americans are currently using remote cardiac monitors and in 2011, the Veterans Health Administration delivered over 300,000 remote consultations using telemedicine. Over half of all U.S. hospitals now use some form of telemedicine. Around the world, millions of patients use telemedicine to monitor their vital signs, remain healthy and out of hospitals and emergency rooms. Consumers and physicians download health and wellness applications for use on their cell phones. 

Once shared, that knowledge takes on a life of its own, growing and moving in all directions. Primary-care clinicians learn from their specialist mentors at the university hubs, but they also learn from each other. And by applying the knowledge they gain in the field, they produce new knowledge, which they then relay to their specialist and primary-care colleagues in their learning community.

In the early days of telemedicine, health professionals used the burgeoning technology as a way to reach patients living in rural areas. However, the technology quickly expanded into urban areas, especially those that suffered from healthcare shortages. In 1967, physicians at the University of Miami School of Medicine and Miami's Fire Department transmitted electrocardiographic rhythms over existing voice radio channels from fire-rescue units to the city's Jackson Memorial Hospital.


There are currently 29 states with telemedicine parity laws, which require private payers to reimburse in the same way they would for an in-person visit. As additional states adopt parity laws, private payers may institute more guidelines and restrictions for telemedicine services. Although it’s a step in the right direction, there is still uncertainty regarding reimbursement rates, billing procedures, and more.
Not all state and federal agencies define telehealth in exactly the same terms, but most are fairly consistent with the federal Health Resources and Services Administration, which defines telehealth this way, “The use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support long-distance clinical health care, patient and professional health-related education, public health and health administration.”
Telemedicine in the trauma operating room: trauma surgeons are able to observe and consult on cases from a remote location using video conferencing. This capability allows the attending to view the residents in real time. The remote surgeon has the capability to control the camera (pan, tilt and zoom) to get the best angle of the procedure while at the same time providing expertise in order to provide the best possible care to the patient.[44]

The rate of adoption of telehealth services in any jurisdiction is frequently influenced by factors such as the adequacy and cost of existing conventional health services in meeting patient needs; the policies of governments and/or insurers with respect to coverage and payment for telehealth services; and medical licensing requirements that may inhibit or deter the provision of telehealth second opinions or primary consultations by physicians.
“When you see this, risks will decrease quickly: Reimbursement will move forward, and where the money goes, vendors’ energy to continuously improve the technology will follow,” he said. “The key is to securely allow the patient and provider to feel connected to one another and follow that connection through to the post-visit workflows that complete the experience – the doctor or his nurse completing documentation and orders, the patient scheduling follow-up and payment.”
Emergency room and urgent care environments are known for long wait times, overcrowding and even staffing shortages. This leads to additional stress being added to not only the patient, but the staff too. With tele-triage, patients can arrive to an emergency department and be seen by an off-site physician using video conferencing software. The off-site physician can order tests or determine a treatment plan, which moves patients through the system faster. Cases that are more severe can be moved to the next level of patient care and others can be discharged.
The range and use of telehealth services have expanded over the past decades, along with the role of technology in improving and coordinating care. Traditional models of telehealth involve care delivered to a patient at an originating (or spoke) site from a specialist working at a distant (or hub) site. A telehealth network consists of a series of originating sites receiving services from a collaborating distant site.

The content on this website is made available for educational purposes only, and is not to be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. To get a medical diagnosis for your condition, book an appointment with a PlushCare doctor or your own primary care physician. This blog and all contents herein are the intellectual property of PlushCare and may not be used or copied without written permission.
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