In the early days, telemedicine was used mostly to connect doctors working with a patient in one location to specialists somewhere else. This was of great benefit to rural or hard to reach populations where specialists aren’t readily available. Throughout the next several decades, the equipment necessary to conduct remote visits remained expensive and complex, so the use of the approach, while growing, was limited.
Doctor on Demand is a telemedicine service that gives you access to medical doctors 24/7/365 for the treatment of common and worrisome ailments such as urinary tract infections, skin and eye issues, and minor sports injuries. These problems can sometimes lead to trips to the emergency room simply because you cannot get to your doctor in a timely manner. With this service, you register, request a doctor and meet one quickly via your computer or smart device.
Teleophthalmology is a branch of telemedicine that delivers eye care through digital medical equipment and telecommunications technology. Today, applications of teleophthalmology encompass access to eye specialists for patients in remote areas, ophthalmic disease screening, diagnosis and monitoring; as well as distant learning. Teleophthalmology may help reduce disparities by providing remote, low-cost screening tests such as diabetic retinopathy screening to low-income and uninsured patients.[75][76] In Mizoram, India, a hilly area with poor roads, between 2011 till 2015, Tele-ophthalmology has provided care to over 10000 patients. These patients were examined by ophthalmic assistants locally but surgery was done on appointment after viewing the patient images online by Eye Surgeons in the hospital 6–12 hours away. Instead of an average 5 trips for say, a cataract procedure, only one was required for surgery alone as even post op care like stitch removal and glasses was done locally. There were huge cost savings in travel etc.[77]
Telepathology has been successfully used for many applications including the rendering histopathology tissue diagnoses, at a distance, for education, and for research. Although digital pathology imaging, including virtual microscopy, is the mode of choice for telepathology services in developed countries, analog telepathology imaging is still used for patient services in some developing countries.
In addition to the parity laws, some states require providers to obtain patient consent before using telehealth services. Failure to obtain patient consent may result in physicians not being paid. Providers also have to be aware that while some states do not legally require consent, if they bill telemedicine through Medicaid, they will need written consent.

Telehealth for Education and Training: Numerous organizations provide healthcare education with the help of digital telehealth technologies including Harvard’s Safety, Quality, Informatics and Leadership (SQIL) program which takes a blended learning approach. SQIL uses on-demand content combined with in-person training to create a new medical education model that uses “information technology (IT), data, and a culture of continuous improvement to enable healthcare organizations to evolve into true learning systems.” Time-crunched physicians are increasingly using online and mobile platforms to meet their CME and MOC requirements, and to prepare for Board Exams.
A telemedicine vendor should have no reservations in signing a Business Associate Agreement. Those that do sign one are confident in their ability to securely store patient information. VSee is currently the only company that offers a HIPAA Messenger App for organizations to try for free. They are confident that their telemedicine solutions can protect pertinent patient information.
But getting doctors to jump on board is easier said than done, and takes time. Many are afraid of liability, as it's possible to miss something during a remote visit. And for years, it wasn't clear whether they would get paid as much as an in-person visit. Reimbursement questions are still getting resolved across different states, but most of the commercial and government plans are on board with the idea of telemedicine -- at least in specific circumstances.
If you’re not ready to make the jump to do a televisit with Statcare’s doctor on call, you can still visit one of our urgent care locations to get the same excellent care. We have locations in Brooklyn, Hicksville, The Bronx and Astoria where we welcome walk-ins seven days a week, 365 days a year. Statcare urgent care is the only walk-in urgent care to have earned The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval in 2012 and have worked to maintain the excellence you’ve come to expect over the years. Read more about our locations, our services and how you can contact us here.

The population of the United States is growing, aging, and becoming more prone to chronic conditions like diabetes, congestive heart failure, and COPD. This is creating a perfect storm of demand on the healthcare system, yet there is a shortage in the pipeline of healthcare providers being educated, trained, and licensed to practice. This necessitates getting very smart about how healthcare resources are leveraged to provide high-quality care to the highest number of people possible.  Telehealth technologies increase the efficiency of the healthcare system overall by maximizing the productivity of each provider and removing geographical barriers to care.
Kaitlin Brasier has worked in primary care since 2012 and provided virtual care since 2013. She received her Doctor of Nursing Practice from the University of San Diego in 2012. In addition to providing virtual care, she works in a dermatology clinic. She has extensive experience in family practice nursing and women's health and has conducted research on childhood obesity prevention. She enjoys outdoor activities, including hiking, snowboarding and horseback riding. She also likes cooking, reading and travel.
Healthcare systems that adopt telemedicine solutions can attest that it requires a lot of time and money. Implementing a new system requires training and sometimes staff members find it difficult to welcome this change. Practice managers, nurses, physicians, and more have to learn how to utilize the system so that practices can see the benefits. Although telemedicine is expensive in the beginning, healthcare systems should see a positive return on investment over time due to more patients and less staff.
Whether on vacation with your kids, away from your home base for business, or in between family doctors, the use of online medical care opens windows and doors to around the clock consultations and medical services. The internet has made it possible for people in rural towns to reach city doctors, for men and women on the road to access much needed prescriptions, and for busy parents to get medical help without packing the kids up and hauling them down to the nearest clinic.

Telehealth is sometimes discussed interchangeably with telemedicine. The Health Resources and Services Administration distinguishes telehealth from telemedicine in its scope. According to them, telemedicine only describes remote clinical services; such as diagnosis and monitoring, while telehealth includes preventative, promotive and curative care delivery.[1] This includes the above-mentioned non-clinical applications like administration and provider education which make telehealth the preferred modern terminology.[2]
We make any additions or deletions to the services defined as Medicare telehealth services effective on a January 1st basis. The annual physician fee schedule proposed rule published in the summer and the final rule (published by November 1) is used as the vehicle to make these changes. The public has the opportunity to submit requests to add or delete services on an ongoing basis.

The most common forms of treatment include medications like Cialis, Levitra, or Viagra. After completing the online questionnaire and speaking with a registered doctor, a physician will be able to determine which medication will work best for your situation, or prescribe a refill from a previous prescription. For more information on prescription medication for ED,click here!

Telemedicine reimbursement is a difficult topic, especially with the constantly changing state policies. Many states now have parity laws which require private payers to reimburse for telemedicine visits the same way as in-person visits. The best way to navigate reimbursement is to call up your top payers and ask their policies. You can also check out our guide to telemedicine reimbursement and this helpful matrix from ATA on state policy.


Telehealth Addresses Primary Care Physician Shortages/Specialist Scarcity: Telehealth is allowing patients at smaller, less-resourced hospitals to gain access to specialists based at larger regional facilities. Undeniably, lack of access and hard-to-reach populations are drivers of telehealth innovations as supported by this 2014 MUSC study on the use of telehospitalists to address physician shortages. Telehealth is being implemented to treat prison populations, as well as being deployed in rural communities and underserved urban areas to improve healthcare availability.
As the CCHP notes, different organizations have different definitions for telehealth. California very specifically defines it as “the mode of delivering healthcare services and public health via information and communication technologies to facilitate the diagnosis, consultation, treatment, education, care management and self-management of a patient's healthcare while the patient is at the originating site and the healthcare provider is at a distant site. Telehealth facilitates patient self-management and caregiver support for patients and includes synchronous interactions and asynchronous store and forward transfers.” The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), meanwhile, defines it as “the use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support long-distance clinical healthcare, patient and professional health-related education, public health and health administration.”
Lab work and scheduling will be handled virtually on Doctor On Demand’s mobile app. Between Quest and LabCorp, patients should be able to visit a lab in-person and continue care via the app with their assigned doctor. It’s a move that will allow the tele-provider to move beyond urgent care into preventative care and encourage more regular virtual visits.
Teleneuropsychology (Cullum et al., 2014) is the use of telehealth/videoconference technology for the remote administration of neuropsychological tests. Neuropsychological tests are used to evaluate the cognitive status of individuals with known or suspected brain disorders and provide a profile of cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Through a series of studies, there is growing support in the literature showing that remote videoconference-based administration of many standard neuropsychological tests results in test findings that are similar to traditional in-person evaluations, thereby establishing the basis for the reliability and validity of teleneuropsychological assessment.[30][31][32][32][33][34][35]
Sometimes the answer to the question “What is telemedicine?” is simply mobile medicine. It doesn’t require a heavy desktop computer or a lot of equipment. Activities that used to happen only in person are now easy to do on a smartphone. Modern consumers are accustomed to downloading apps and using their smartphones for simple transactions. The same is true for doctor visits. For example, with MDLIVE the patient simply opens the app and clicks to choose a doctor, with whom they can speak either by phone, instant message, or video.    
I'm a former scientist, using words and an audio recorder as my new research tools to untangle the health and food issues that matter most to consumers. I live in Brooklyn, N.Y., where I cook as much as possible. You can find me in the grocery aisle scrutinizing the fine print of every food item I put into my cart. Follow me on Twitter @juliacalderone.
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