Through telemedicine, doctors and other health professionals provide an array of important clinical services—from diagnosis to imaging to surgery to counseling—to patients in remote locations. You can find telemedicine (sometimes referred to as "telehealth" in certain contexts) in hospital operating rooms, in rural community health centers, in school-based clinics, in ambulances, and in nursing homes.
Unfortunately, there is no medication which removes the chance of contagion, but through careful planning, proper protection, and prescription medication men and women are able to live life normally once again. Prescriptions for Acyclovir and Valtrex can help to keep the virus from spreading or multiplying. Topical creams, and over the counter pain medication can also be used for the redness and discomfort associated with the illness.
Glenda Clemens has worked in primary care since 2001 and provided virtual care since 2012. She has practiced medicine as a nurse's aide, licensed practical nurse and registered nurse before receiving her Master of Nursing from the University of Oklahoma. From running her own practice to caring for veterans, she demonstrates a commitment to providing care to underserved populations. When she is not working, she enjoys knitting, crocheting and writing poetry.
With telemedicine, patients can connect with their dermatologist using a smartphone, tablet, or computer. Using high definition images and video, dermatologists can examine a patient suffering from psoriasis, eczema, bedsores, and more. This is extremely convenient for those patients that are housebound. Using telemedicine solutions, dermatologists can diagnose and treat skin care conditions effectively and efficiently. In addition, it not only saves a patient from travelling to a clinic but it also helps them maintain their dignity.
Teladoc Health enjoys a killer advantage with its head start in telehealth. Around 40% of the largest companies in the world contract with Teladoc to provide virtual healthcare services to their employees. Over 35 of the biggest health plans in the U.S. have partnered with Teladoc. More than 290 hospitals and health systems have teamed up with the telehealth leader.
With telehealth allowing physicians to expand their coverage area, there have been questions regarding interstate medical licensing. Interstate medical licensing permits more physicians to serve individuals in underserved and rural areas, but currently, only a few states offer this. The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact helps streamline the licensing process for physicians that are interested in practising in participating states.
To date, there are 33 states plus the District of Columbia, that have parity laws that require private payer reimbursement for telemedicine services. All states with parity laws require private payers to pay for video-conferencing. To date, only a few states require reimbursement for store and forward telemedicine. Organizations should also understand that payment for telemedicine services may not equal that of onsite services.
Telemedicine was originally created as a way to treat patients who were located in remote places, far away from local health facilities or in areas of with shortages of medical professionals. While telemedicine is still used today to address these problems, it’s increasingly becoming a tool for convenient medical care. Today’s connected patient wants to waste less time in the waiting room at the doctor, and get immediate care for minor but urgent conditions when they need it.
Teladoc charges an annual subscription fee for its service plus a $40 co-pay per video or phone appointment with a doctor, though employers sometimes subsidize or cover the co-pay completely for their employees. Health insurance startup Oscar (co-founded by venture capitalist Joshua Kushner), for one, has promoted its ACA-compliant health plans with the perk of getting to talk to doctors 24 hours a day—through Teladoc—for free.
Telemedicine reimbursement is a difficult topic, especially with the constantly changing state policies. Many states now have parity laws which require private payers to reimburse for telemedicine visits the same way as in-person visits. The best way to navigate reimbursement is to call up your top payers and ask their policies. You can also check out our guide to telemedicine reimbursement and this helpful matrix from ATA on state policy.
However, whether or not the standard of health care quality is increasing is quite debatable, with literature refuting such claims.[23][34][35] Research is increasingly reporting that clinicians find the process difficult and complex to deal with.[34][36] Furthermore, there are concerns around informed consent, legality issues as well as legislative issues. Although health care may become affordable with the help of technology, whether or not this care will be "good" is the issue.[23]

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), is a United States Federal Law that applies to all modes of electronic information exchange such as video-conferencing mental health services. In the United States, Skype, Gchat, Yahoo, and MSN are not permitted to conduct video-conferencing services unless these companies sign a Business Associate Agreement stating that their employees are HIPAA trained. For this reason, most companies provide their own specialized videotelephony services. Violating HIPAA in the United States can result in penalties of hundreds of thousands of dollars.[58]
Today’s competitive health care marketplace has created an environment where patients demand lower costs, higher service quality, and convenient access to services. [2] Telehealth is an innovative and valuable mechanism that provides patients with efficient access to quality services. Lowering costs and removing barriers to service access, are critical components in promoting patient wellness and population health. Convenience and cost-effectiveness are important commodities in the modern health care marketplace, as patients tend to avoid treatment that is difficult to access or too expensive. As a result, telehealth technology is emerging as a preferred choice among patients and providers. Telehealth has also attracted the attention of US legislators. They utilize this tool for improving the competitiveness of American health care services. This is especially important, seeing as health care represents 17 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP). In fact, the resource has helped to define the role that lawmakers play in ensuring that patients benefit in a competitive health care market.
Kaitlin Brasier has worked in primary care since 2012 and provided virtual care since 2013. She received her Doctor of Nursing Practice from the University of San Diego in 2012. In addition to providing virtual care, she works in a dermatology clinic. She has extensive experience in family practice nursing and women's health and has conducted research on childhood obesity prevention. She enjoys outdoor activities, including hiking, snowboarding and horseback riding. She also likes cooking, reading and travel.
Since the internet and mobile devices now pervade our lives, it is natural that people want to leverage telehealth technologies to improve care, offer convenience, promote access, and support sustainability. Telehealth services range from consultations and video conference mental health sessions to public health broadcast text messaging and on-demand provider education.
Dr. Mercado has practiced medicine since 2000, and provided virtual care since 2015. She earned her medical degree at the University of the Philippines in Manila. She completed her Family Medicine Residency at Akron General Medical Center in Ohio, where she was the chief resident during her final year of residency. She has spent the last six working in a primary care setting where she saw patients of all ages. Dr. Mercado believes communication is an integral part of a physician-patient interaction. During her free time, she enjoys reading, traveling, watching movies, volunteering, and spending time with her family.
4. Your pharmacist will then tell you what medication you can have and how much you will have to pay for it. Based on your doctor’s recommendation, costs, and other personal factors, you can now decide what medication to use. It’s a good idea to consult with your doctor to determine what medication would be most effective for your health while staying within your budget.
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