Erin Aas has worked in primary care since 2005 and provided virtual care since 2012. Since receiving his Master of Nursing from Seattle University, he has provided comprehensive primary healthcare and promoted cultural competency in a variety of community health settings. In addition to his full-time work in virtual care, he works shifts in a local Emergency Department. He is proficient in conversational and medical Spanish. Outside of work, he is an accomplished guitarist, choral composer and Ironman triathlete.


Dr. Barnett attended the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine and completed his residency at Swedish Family Medicine. He has over 12 years of experience in practice and began working in Virtual Care over nine years ago. When Dr. Barnett is not providing Virtual Care, he works as a primary care provider for a local health system. He is fluent in Russian and proficient in Spanish. Outside of work, Dr. Barnett enjoys cooking, watching films, photography, and spending time with family.
With the interrelated fields of mobile health, digital health, health IT, telemedicine all constantly changing with new developments, it’s sometimes difficult to pin down a definition for these terms. In much of the healthcare industry, the terms “telehealth” and “telemedicine” are often used interchangeably. In fact, even the ATA considers them to be interchangeable terms. This isn’t surprising since the telehealth and telemedicine definitions encompass very similar services, including: medical education, e-health patient monitoring, patient consultation via video conferencing, health wireless applications, transmission of image medical reports, and many more.

“Another distinction between telemedicine and D2C telehealth is that telemedicine consultations are often with medical specialists like cardiologists, dermatologists and pulmonologists,” Downey continued. “These often occur when the patient is in an underserved rural community and the specialist is in a large urban area. The distance makes it difficult to make and keep appointments otherwise. D2C telehealth, on the other hand, best deals with minor primary care issues over the phone. If deemed to be a more serious health concern, the patient is told to make an appointment with a specialist or to proceed to a hospital emergency room.”
A company’s culture is defined by the behavior that is allowed. The Board, CEO and the management team need to set the example—allowing toxic, demoralizing, untrustworthy actions to persist is implicitly endorsing that behavior. Look to the past for what’s likely to come—every leader in the company has brought former colleagues to work alongside them at DOD except for one. Red flag. This leader burns bridges. Act before...
In 1964, the Nebraska Psychiatric Institute began using television links to form two-way communication with the Norfolk State Hospital which was 112 miles away for the education and consultation purposes between clinicians in the two locations.[9] The Logan International Airport in Boston established in-house medical stations in 1967. These stations were linked to Massachusetts General Hospital. Clinicians at the hospital would provide consultation services to patients who were at the airport. Consultations were achieved through microwave audio as well as video links.[5][9]
Up until 2013, hospitals were required to staff their EDs with a physician 24 hours a day, either on site or on call. In 2013, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services adjusted that requirement to allow rural hospitals to use advanced practice providers, such as a physician assistants and nurse practitioners, as long as physicians could be summoned via telemedicine in an emergency.
Reimbursement for telemedicine services is often not as straightforward for traditional medical services. State telemedicine policy landscape is continuously shifting, affecting rules around reimbursement through state Medicaid programs and through private payers. Medicare does now reimburses for real-time telemedicine services, but places restrictions on the eligible healthcare providers, the location of the patient, the medical procedures that can be done, etc. The good news is, there is a shift towards more widespread reimbursement for telemedicine through all third-party payers, with less restrictions.  

Doctor On Demand operates subject to state laws. As of August 2017, Doctor On Demand offers behavioral healthcare in all states where Mental Health services are available to Doctor On Demand’s patient population at large, and Medical care in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Doctor On Demand is not intended to replace an annual, in-person visit with a primary care physician.** Doctor On Demand physicians do not prescribe Controlled Substances, and may elect not to treat or prescribe other medications based on what is clinically appropriate.
In many states, current regulations require that any provider and patient doing a telemedicine visit have a pre-existing relationship. Usually this means that the provider and patient need to have had at least one in-person visit. This regulation is slowly changing as more companies like Teladoc and DoctoronDemand seek to connect patients with a random, on-call doctor for immediate care.
Store-and-forward telemedicine works best for interprofessional medical services – where a provider needs to outsource diagnosis to a specialist. For instance, teleradiology relies heavily on store-and-forward technology to allow technicians and healthcare professionals at smaller hospitals to share patient x-rays for diagnosis by a specialist at another location. Asynchronous telemedicine is also commonly used for teledermatology and teleophthalmology.
Telepathology has been successfully used for many applications including the rendering histopathology tissue diagnoses, at a distance, for education, and for research. Although digital pathology imaging, including virtual microscopy, is the mode of choice for telepathology services in developed countries, analog telepathology imaging is still used for patient services in some developing countries.
Yet healthcare systems struggle to turn this form of technology into a profitable revenue stream. Consumers have been slow to adopt this model. And, according to a Rand study published in 2017, it appears to attract a new set of consumers who might not otherwise use medical services, thereby driving costs up. Findings related to utilization and spending for acute respiratory illness based on commercial claims data from more than 300,000 patients between 2011 and 2013 included:
"Unless you plan to stay away from other people and public places during this time of year, the flu shot is your best form of protection from the flu,” Dr. Kristin Dean, associate medical director at @drondemand, tells @EliteDaily.https://www.elitedaily.com/p/are-flu-shots-really-necessary-more-people-are-opting-out-of-the-shot-survey-says-14706423 …

Medical City Virtual Care allows patients to see and talk to licensed, board-certified physicians, nurse practitioners or physician assistants from their mobile device or computer through a secure internet video connection. These healthcare professionals can diagnose, treat and prescribe non-narcotic medication for a wide variety of adult and pediatric non-emergency medical conditions, including:

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