Hypertension disorder affects approximately one third of the adult population in the United States. The cause usually stems from improper nutrition, obesity, cigarette smoke, alcohol abuse, high sodium intake, and a lack of regular physical activity. While making life changes can eventually lower blood pressure to a healthy level once more, it is sometimes necessary to treat the issue with a prescription medication.


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“Our executive leadership have been strong supporters of telemedicine at UPMC for more than a decade,” said Sokolovich of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. “With the initial success of tele-stroke and tele-behavioral health services, leadership recognizes the potential of telehealth in implementing new models of care that enhance the patient experience, support access to quality care regardless of geographic location, and maximize efficiencies.”

Tim Panek has worked in primary care since 1999 and provided virtual care since 2011. He received his Master of Nursing from the University of Washington and has worked in many primary and urgent care settings in Washington State. He is an adjunct clinical faculty member at the University of Washington School of Nursing. He is also a high school soccer coach and enjoys golf, fly-fishing, skiing and hiking with his family.


The rate of adoption of telehealth services in any jurisdiction is frequently influenced by factors such as the adequacy and cost of existing conventional health services in meeting patient needs; the policies of governments and/or insurers with respect to coverage and payment for telehealth services; and medical licensing requirements that may inhibit or deter the provision of telehealth second opinions or primary consultations by physicians.
In the 2010s, integration of smart home telehealth technologies (wellness and health devices and software, Internet of Things) appears to be a growing phenomenon in the industry. Beyond that, healthcare organizations are increasingly adopting the use of self-tracking technologies, cloud-based technologies, and innovative data analytic approaches to accelerate the transformation of the healthcare system.
Medicaid will cover telemedicine services depending on the legislation passed in that state. Since Medicaid programs are state-run, they follow state-specific telemedicine regulations. In 46 states, Medicaid offers some kind of physician reimbursement for telemedicine services delivered over live video. 26 state Medicaid programs will also pay an additional facility or transmission fee to cover the cost of hosting a telemedicine visit, or transmitting patient medical data in a secure way. The specific restrictions and regulations around telemedicine vary widely by state. To find out more about you’re your state Medicaid program will cover, visit the Center for Connected Health Policy’s recent report.

The term ‘telehealth’ is gaining popularity among medical professionals, compared to the original term, ‘telemedicine.’ [4] Some medical professionals use the names interchangeably. However, telemedicine is a term that may apply to the application of any technology in the clinical setting, while telehealth more distinctly describes the delivery of services to patients. Telemedicine is a familiar term, but telehealth more appropriately describes the latest trends in using technology to deliver treatments to patients. Depending on the organization, service providers may use a different definitions of telehealth. Although the basic premise remains similar, the context may change according to factors such as organizational objectives, and the needs of the patient population being served. Medical experts do agree on one point; telehealth is an innovative way of engaging patients, and it is highly beneficial for both providers and patients.
The future of telemedicine is wide open, with room for drastic improvement and more technology based medical care. As the world of tech continues to evolve, so too can the world of telehealth. Already, patients can sit down for a one on one appointment anywhere and anytime with the use of nothing more than a mobile phone. Imagine what new technology will bring in terms of holographic imaging, long distance x-ray, and more work in the field of ultrasounds.
Medical City Virtual Care allows patients to see and talk to licensed, board-certified physicians, nurse practitioners or physician assistants from their mobile device or computer through a secure internet video connection. These healthcare professionals can diagnose, treat and prescribe non-narcotic medication for a wide variety of adult and pediatric non-emergency medical conditions, including:

^ Arora, Sanjeev; Thornton, Karla; Murata, Glen; Deming, Paulina; Kalishman, Summers; Dion, Denise; Parish, Brooke; Burke, Thomas; Pak, Wesley; Dunkelberg, Jeffrey; Kistin, Martin; Brown, John; Jenkusky, Steven; Komaromy, Miriam; Qualls, Clifford (2011). "Outcomes of Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection by Primary Care Providers". New England Journal of Medicine. 364 (23): 2199–207. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1009370. PMC 3820419. PMID 21631316.
A major legal action prompt in telehealth thus far has been issues surrounding online prescribing and whether an appropriate clinician-patient relationship can be established online to make prescribing safe, making this an area that requires particular scrutiny.[22] It may be required that the practitioner and patient involved must meet in person at least once before online prescribing can occur, or that at least a live-video conference must occur, not just impersonal questionnaires or surveys to determine need.[43]
While the industry is still a long way from a standard set of established guidelines for telemedicine, the American Telemedicine Association has put together guidelines for a range of specialties based on a survey hundreds of research study. What are the clinical, technical, and administrative guidelines a medical practice needs to put in place when they’re adopting telemedicine? Beyond the minimal legal requirements of that state, what are telemedicine best practices?
The future of telemedicine is wide open, with room for drastic improvement and more technology based medical care. As the world of tech continues to evolve, so too can the world of telehealth. Already, patients can sit down for a one on one appointment anywhere and anytime with the use of nothing more than a mobile phone. Imagine what new technology will bring in terms of holographic imaging, long distance x-ray, and more work in the field of ultrasounds.
On July 7th, 2015, House representatives introduced the Medicare Telehealth Parity Act of 2015. If passed, the bill will expand what telemedicine services Medicare will cover and get rid of many limitations (like the requirements for what qualifies as an “originating site“). Legislation like this one could have a huge impact on coverage for remote patient monitoring and other telemedicine services delivered to the patient in their own home.

More accessible, convenient healthcare for patients is the driving force behind the telemedicine field. Telemedicine was originally developed in the U.S. as a way to address care shortages, especially in remote rural areas. Now telemedicine is used around the world, whether it’s to provide basic healthcare in third-world countries or allow an elderly patient with mobility issues to see the doctor from home. Telemedicine has the power not only to break down typical geographical barriers to care access, but to make the entire healthcare delivery model more convenient to patients.
“Telemedicine is not a separate medical specialty,” the organization continues. “Products and services related to telemedicine are often part of a larger investment by healthcare institutions in either information technology or the delivery of clinical care. Even in the reimbursement fee structure, there is usually no distinction made between services provided on site and those provided through telemedicine and often no separate coding required for billing of remote services. ATA has historically considered telemedicine and telehealth to be interchangeable terms, encompassing a wide definition of remote healthcare. Patient consultations via video conferencing, transmission of still images, e-health including patient portals, remote monitoring of vital signs, continuing medical education, consumer-focused wireless applications and nursing call centers, among other applications, are all considered part of telemedicine and telehealth.”
Telehealth - powered by Teladoc - is a convenient, affordable new way to access quality care for general medical, behavioral health, and dermatology2 services by web, phone3, or mobile app. Connect with a board-certified doctor, therapist, or dermatologist from the comfort of home, during your lunch break, or while traveling throughout the country. 
Sharla Peterson has worked in primary care since 2007 and provided virtual care since 2011. She received her Master of Nursing from Washington State University. In addition to her career in telemedicine, she works part-time in a plastic surgery office and volunteers at a free clinic near her home. She serves as Medical Director for local Camporee events with the Boy Scouts of America and works with youth in her church. When she is not working, she enjoys cooking, family time and outdoor adventures of all kinds.
Seek reliable information and medical advice about illnesses by body part - we have detailed information about any kind of medical condition in our database. There are also details about the kind of medication (allopathic, ayurvedic and homeopathic) that needs to be taken in certain medical conditions. You can also checkout relevant videos of specialist doctors.
In-office visits and overnight stays at healthcare facilities can be difficult for individuals in poor health. Telehealth services reduce hospital readmission rates by enabling doctors to monitor patients outside the office. Because of this, many hospitals have already started to include some form of remote monitoring as part of their post-discharge plans. By equipping patients with wearable devices or other wireless technologies, clinicians can monitor vital signs and symptoms and adjust care as needed without an in-office visit. Alignment Healthcare, for example, developed a program to remotely monitor chronically ill and recently discharged patients and reduce 30-day readmission rates. Enrollees were given a package of Bluetooth-enabled monitoring equipment, including a Samsung tablet, blood pressure cuff, pulse oximeter and scale.
In the NICU/ICU, telemedicine can be used in a variety of ways. One approach is by using HD webcams to see the baby from different angles. High-risk infants can be seen by a specialist at another hospital by simply sharing the video within seconds. This decreases the need for infants to be transferred to another hospital, which is costly and time consuming.
Jamee has provided care since 2002, and provided virtual care since 2015. She received her Bachelor and Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Texas in Houston. Jamee has spent the majority of her nursing career with a focus in emergency and urgent care, transitioning her focus to Family Practice in 2014. She recently relocated to the Northwest from Dallas with her husband and five children. She enjoys reading, crafts, cooking and camping.
34 states and the District of Columbia require that private insurers cover telehealth the same as they cover in-person services. Many other insurers cover at least some telehealth service--and many more have expressed interest in expanding their telehealth coverage. To find out if your insurance company covers telehealth services, please contact your benefits manager. 
Healthcare systems that are thinking about implementing telemedicine solutions should consult with experts in the industry. VSee, a leading telemedicine organization, suggests that practices do not rush into telemedicine without having the right equipment. They offer a variety of practical solutions for practices wanting to add telemedicine to their clinic and can make the integration more seamless.
Application Service Provider (ASP): Various applications are hosted by an ASP on a central server. Customers can pay a fee to access the applications they want to use over either a private network or secure Internet connection. This allows customers to rent applications that they need to use from an ASP instead of having to buy, install and then maintain software on their own. Usually software upgrades and new releases are included in the rental price.
“It really helped our emergency room with treating stroke patients and benefited patient care by avoiding transportation when minutes matter,” he explained. “We see telemedicine as a solution to expand access to care without leaving the home, as well as a solution for gaining access to a specialist who may not have the patient volumes to relocate to our market.”
Telehealth and Provider Communication: A significant telehealth development is the increased communication via digital and telecommunications platforms among care providers. Care teams are enabled through telehealth technologies to more easily share information and collaborate in the treatment of their patients. PCPs are using telehealth platforms to consult with specialists and other providers to promote access for their patients in low provider availability areas.
Projections for the growth of the telehealth market are optimistic, and much of this optimism is predicated upon the increasing demand for remote medical care. According to a recent survey, nearly three-quarters of U.S. consumers say they would use telehealth.[44] At present, several major companies along with a bevvy of startups are working to develop a leading presence in the field.
Telemedicine is the use of telecommunication and information technology to provide clinical health care from a distance. It has been used to overcome distance barriers and to improve access to medical services that would often not be consistently available in distant rural communities. It is also used to save lives in critical care and emergency situations.
Based on over 600 studies, the AMA has put together a comprehensive set of guidelines for professionals using telemedicine in primary and urgent care – a field that is quickly adopting telemedicine to expand basic healthcare access. Here are some of the basic protocols and rules a primary care or urgent care facility should put into place when starting their telemedicine program.
Healthcare providers currently earn their medical licenses for a specific state. This lets them practice medicine legally in that state, and only that state. This presents a problem for telemedicine, as the entire goal is to break down geographical barriers between a patient and provider. According to medical licensing regulations, a specialist based in Colorado would not be legally allowed to treat a patient in New Mexico.
Reimbursement for telemedicine services is often not as straightforward for traditional medical services. State telemedicine policy landscape is continuously shifting, affecting rules around reimbursement through state Medicaid programs and through private payers. Medicare does now reimburses for real-time telemedicine services, but places restrictions on the eligible healthcare providers, the location of the patient, the medical procedures that can be done, etc. The good news is, there is a shift towards more widespread reimbursement for telemedicine through all third-party payers, with less restrictions.  
In Australia, during January 2014, Melbourne tech startup Small World Social collaborated with the Australian Breastfeeding Association to create the first hands-free breastfeeding Google Glass application for new mothers.[23] The application, named Google Glass Breastfeeding app trial, allows mothers to nurse their baby while viewing instructions about common breastfeeding issues (latching on, posture etc.) or call a lactation consultant via a secure Google Hangout,[24] who can view the issue through the mother's Google Glass camera.[25] The trial was successfully concluded in Melbourne in April 2014, and 100% of participants were breastfeeding confidently.[26][27] Small World Social[28] Breasfteeding Support Project.[29]
It’s also important to note that many doctors using telemedicine will charge the patient a convenience fee, ranging from $35 – $125 per visit. This fee is direct from the patient and is on top of (or in place of) any reimbursement through a payer. While that means patients are paying out-of-pocket, many of eVisit’s clients have found patients don’t mind, and in fact are happy to pay the additional fee for the convenience.
Teladoc (NYSE:TDOC) is the global leader in virtual care. A mission-driven organization, the company is successfully modernizing how people access and experience healthcare, with a focus on high quality, lower costs, and improved outcomes around the world. The company’s award-winning, integrated clinical solutions are inclusive of telehealth, expert medical opinions, AI and analytics, and licensable platform services. With more than 2,000 employees, the organization delivers care in 125 countries and in more than 20 languages, partnering with employers, hospitals and health systems, and insurers to transform care delivery.
Real-time communication is probably what jumps to mind when you think of telehealth technology. It happens with the patient is at one location and the provider is at another and they connect using a video-enabled device and a telephone or computer audio. Sometimes the patient might be at a healthcare facility with a provider and they establish communications with a specialist at a remote location, other times the patient might not be at a medical office at all. She might join the encounter from work or the office, for example. Many state laws require insurers to reimburse for these types of video visits. Most don’t have a similar stipulation for telephone calls that don’t involve video.
This expectation for more convenient care, combined with the unavailability of many overburdened medical professionals (especially primary care providers) have led to the rise of telemedicine companies. Many offer patients 24/7 access to medical care with an on-call doctor contracted by that company. Others offer hospitals and larger health centers access to extra clinical staff and specialists, for outsourcing of special cases (common model among teleradiology companies). Still others provide a telemedicine platform for physicians to use to offer virtual visits with their own patients. Increasingly, telemedicine is becoming a way to give medical practices an edge in a competitive healthcare landscape where it’s difficult to stay independent or maintain a healthy bottom line.

Multi-point Teleconferencing – This is the process of connecting multiple users from different sites. It allows electronic communication between the users as well as transmission of video, voice and data between computers and systems. Multi-point teleconferencing requires the use of a multi-point control unit or the bridge to be able to connect the different sites for the videoconference.
Medicaid will cover telemedicine services depending on the legislation passed in that state. Since Medicaid programs are state-run, they follow state-specific telemedicine regulations. In 46 states, Medicaid offers some kind of physician reimbursement for telemedicine services delivered over live video. 26 state Medicaid programs will also pay an additional facility or transmission fee to cover the cost of hosting a telemedicine visit, or transmitting patient medical data in a secure way. The specific restrictions and regulations around telemedicine vary widely by state. To find out more about you’re your state Medicaid program will cover, visit the Center for Connected Health Policy’s recent report.

HIT is the generation and transmission of digital health data, often through an electronic health record. Generally, HIT is used for administrative functions (keeping track of patient's health history, sharing information between providers, etc.) while telemedicine is the delivery of an actual clinical service. HIT can facilitate telemedicine but it is not a requirement for delivering remote health care.


The creation of telemedicine began with the inception of the telecommunications infrastructure, which included the telegraph, telephone, and radio. Casualties and injuries were reported using the telegraph during the Civil War, in addition to the ordering of medical supplies and consultations. This is considered one the earliest adoptions of telemedicine technology.
“Creating a viable telemedicine program is both a short-term and a long-term proposition,” said Daniel Barchi, CIO at New York-Presbyterian. “It is possible, with a small team and early investment of resources, to create telemedicine capability in a specific vertical. It could be post-surgical follow-up visits for patients and surgeons, medication reconciliation video visits with a pharmacist, or urgent care emergency department video calls.”

Teleneuropsychology (Cullum et al., 2014) is the use of telehealth/videoconference technology for the remote administration of neuropsychological tests. Neuropsychological tests are used to evaluate the cognitive status of individuals with known or suspected brain disorders and provide a profile of cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Through a series of studies, there is growing support in the literature showing that remote videoconference-based administration of many standard neuropsychological tests results in test findings that are similar to traditional in-person evaluations, thereby establishing the basis for the reliability and validity of teleneuropsychological assessment.[30][31][32][32][33][34][35]

Jamee has provided care since 2002, and provided virtual care since 2015. She received her Bachelor and Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Texas in Houston. Jamee has spent the majority of her nursing career with a focus in emergency and urgent care, transitioning her focus to Family Practice in 2014. She recently relocated to the Northwest from Dallas with her husband and five children. She enjoys reading, crafts, cooking and camping.
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