Teladoc is the oldest and largest telemedicine company in United States. It was launched in 2002 in Dallas, Texas by Dr. Byron Brooks, a former NASA flight surgeon, and serial entrepreneur Michael Gorton.[7] Teladoc launched nationally in 2005 at the Consumer Directed Health Care Conference, in Chicago, Illinois.[8] By the end of 2007, it had attracted about 1 million members, including large employers who provided it to their employees as a health benefit. Jason Gorevic was named CEO in 2009 and currently holds the role and sits on the company's board of directors.[9]
Presenters or Patient Presenters – They are the ones who provide telehealth services and perform the overall exam for patients. Such presenters should be on the medical field and they must have experiences in providing health services to patients like registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. They were trained in the use of the equipment like cameras and computers, and they are the ones who communicate with the patients on the originating site. They can also perform the different activities which are part of the diagnostic examination.

The Satellite African eHEalth vaLidation (SAHEL) demonstration project has shown how satellite broadband technology can be used to establish telemedicine in such areas. SAHEL was started in 2010 in Kenya and Senegal, providing self-contained, solar-powered internet terminals to rural villages for use by community nurses for collaboration with distant health centres for training, diagnosis and advice on local health issues[92]
Telemedicine is used in many different medical fields, throughout ambulatory and hospital settings. Almost every medical field has some use for consulting a patient or another provider (usually a specialist) remotely. Because of shortages of care, limited access to specialists in some areas, and remote locations of patients (especially in rural or sparsely populated areas), telemedicine is incredibly useful to any healthcare provider trying to expand access to quality patient care.

Teladoc charges an annual subscription fee for its service plus a $40 co-pay per video or phone appointment with a doctor, though employers sometimes subsidize or cover the co-pay completely for their employees. Health insurance startup Oscar (co-founded by venture capitalist Joshua Kushner), for one, has promoted its ACA-compliant health plans with the perk of getting to talk to doctors 24 hours a day—through Teladoc—for free.
Telemedicine is a significant and rapidly growing component of health care in the United States.  There are currently about 200 telemedicine networks, with 3,500 service sites in the US. Nearly 1 million Americans are currently using remote cardiac monitors and in 2011, the Veterans Health Administration delivered over 300,000 remote consultations using telemedicine. Over half of all U.S. hospitals now use some form of telemedicine. Around the world, millions of patients use telemedicine to monitor their vital signs, remain healthy and out of hospitals and emergency rooms. Consumers and physicians download health and wellness applications for use on their cell phones. 

Tim Panek has worked in primary care since 1999 and provided virtual care since 2011. He received his Master of Nursing from the University of Washington and has worked in many primary and urgent care settings in Washington State. He is an adjunct clinical faculty member at the University of Washington School of Nursing. He is also a high school soccer coach and enjoys golf, fly-fishing, skiing and hiking with his family.
Once shared, that knowledge takes on a life of its own, growing and moving in all directions. Primary-care clinicians learn from their specialist mentors at the university hubs, but they also learn from each other. And by applying the knowledge they gain in the field, they produce new knowledge, which they then relay to their specialist and primary-care colleagues in their learning community.
Yes. Guided by technical standards and clinical practice guidelines, and backed by decades of research and demonstrations, telemedicine is a safe and cost-effective way to extend the delivery of health care.  ATA has produced a series of standards, guidelines and best practices for healthcare providers to ensure that they are using telemedicine responsibly.
All the doctors in Teladoc's national network are U.S. board-certified family practitioners, primary care physicians, pediatricians and internists who use Electronic Health Records to diagnose, treat and write prescriptions when necessary. When accessing Teladoc, you'll be connected to a doctor in your state. These doctors are all actively practicing physicians and choose to incorporate telemedicine into their medical practice as a way to offer more affordable, convenient access to quality care.
Flexibility & work/life balance Very open organization with immediate access to executive leadership Transparent and communicative Promotes within organization Celebrates employee milestones and company wins Good benefits Salaries are competitive (at least to my knowledge) Open to new ideas Organization is doing very well and growing really fast Work being done has a positive influence on the current healthcare...

Real-time telemedicine (also called “synchronous telemedicine”) is probably what most people first think of when they hear “telemedicine.” Real-time telemedicine requires a live interaction between either a health professional and patient, or between health professionals, using audio and video communication. Think videochat. While most real-time telemedicine software is much more sophisticated than a simple videochat platform, the basic goal is to both see and talk to the patient from afar. This type of telemedicine is meant to offer a virtual alternative to the in-person doctor’s visit.
All the guidelines and restrictions we’ve listed above are for billing telemedicine through traditional Medicare. Medicare Advantage plans under a commercial payer have complete flexibility to cover telemedicine however they want! This means, Advantage plans may cover telemedicine for your patient and not have any of those restrictions on what qualifies as an eligible originating site. Call the payer and ask what they’ll cover and what their telemedicine guidelines are.
With many rural areas facing a shortage of specialists, telemedicine enables individual doctors to reach more patients. And the cost to patients for telehealth consultations is often lower than an in-office visit. By serving more patients in a shorter amount of time, healthcare organizations can cost-effectively grow their membership while increasing care quality and patient satisfaction.
Only some states have actually regulations requiring healthcare providers to get patients’ informed consent to use telemedicine. However, this is always good practice, whether or not your state requires it. Before the first telemedicine visit, providers should explain to patients how telemedicine works (when service is available, scheduling, privacy etc), any limits on confidentiality, possibility for technical failure, protocols for contact between virtual visits, prescribing policies, and coordinating care with other health professionals. Everything should be explained in simple, clear language.
If a practitioner serves several states, obtaining this license in each state could be an expensive and time-consuming proposition. Even if the practitioner never practices medicine face-to-face with a patient in another state, he/she still must meet a variety of other individual state requirements, including paying substantial licensure fees, passing additional oral and written examinations, and traveling for interviews.
For purposes of Medicaid, telemedicine seeks to improve a patient's health by permitting two-way, real time interactive communication between the patient, and the physician or practitioner at the distant site. This electronic communication means the use of interactive telecommunications equipment that includes, at a minimum, audio and video equipment.
While the industry is still a long way from a standard set of established guidelines for telemedicine, the American Telemedicine Association has put together guidelines for a range of specialties based on a survey hundreds of research study. What are the clinical, technical, and administrative guidelines a medical practice needs to put in place when they’re adopting telemedicine? Beyond the minimal legal requirements of that state, what are telemedicine best practices?
Multi-point Teleconferencing – This is the process of connecting multiple users from different sites. It allows electronic communication between the users as well as transmission of video, voice and data between computers and systems. Multi-point teleconferencing requires the use of a multi-point control unit or the bridge to be able to connect the different sites for the videoconference.
Real-time telemedicine (also called “synchronous telemedicine”) is probably what most people first think of when they hear “telemedicine.” Real-time telemedicine requires a live interaction between either a health professional and patient, or between health professionals, using audio and video communication. Think videochat. While most real-time telemedicine software is much more sophisticated than a simple videochat platform, the basic goal is to both see and talk to the patient from afar. This type of telemedicine is meant to offer a virtual alternative to the in-person doctor’s visit.

Seek reliable information and medical advice about illnesses by body part - we have detailed information about any kind of medical condition in our database. There are also details about the kind of medication (allopathic, ayurvedic and homeopathic) that needs to be taken in certain medical conditions. You can also checkout relevant videos of specialist doctors.


With approximately 30-million cases of thyroid conditions across the U.S., including some 15-million which are undiagnosed, the need for fast and efficient prescriptions in this area is high. Women have a higher chance of contracting disorders of the thyroid, but they can affect men as well. Symptoms include anxiety, chronic fatigue syndrome, numbed senses of smell and taste, lowered sex drive, dry skin, stomach pain, digestive issues, high blood pressure, pain in the joints and muscles, heart palpitations, weight gain, hair loss, and uncontrollable body temperature.

Telenursing is achieving significant growth rates in many countries due to several factors: the preoccupation in reducing the costs of health care, an increase in the number of aging and chronically ill population, and the increase in coverage of health care to distant, rural, small or sparsely populated regions. Among its benefits, telenursing may help solve increasing shortages of nurses; to reduce distances and save travel time, and to keep patients out of hospital. A greater degree of job satisfaction has been registered among telenurses.[22]

Hypertension disorder affects approximately one third of the adult population in the United States. The cause usually stems from improper nutrition, obesity, cigarette smoke, alcohol abuse, high sodium intake, and a lack of regular physical activity. While making life changes can eventually lower blood pressure to a healthy level once more, it is sometimes necessary to treat the issue with a prescription medication.

Online doctor consultation are rapidly gaining popularity these days as more health insurers offer telemedicine services to help cut costs. Studies have shown that virtual care may effectively used to treat common problems such as flu, acne, deer tick bites, sinus and urinary tract infections. Video doctor consultations can save patients a lot in time and convenience. 


Jay McGraw and Adam Jackson, both 35, are changing the way that people interact with their doctors. Along with Dr. Phil, who is McGraw’s father, they launched Doctor On Demand in 2013. The San-Francisco-based startup offers online video consultations with 1,400 credentialed physicians around the country. One million people have downloaded the app -- and it’s raised $74 million in VC funding to date.


Ravyn Ramos has practiced medicine since 2009 and provided virtual care since 2014. She received her Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine degree from Bastyr University in 2004, and her Master of Nursing from Seattle University in 2007. In addition to her work in telemedicine, she serves as clinical faculty in Walden University's distance learning program, as well as practicing as a Family Nurse Practitioner in several local medical centers. In her spare time, she enjoys Bikram yoga, baking bread, traveling and watching the Sounders.
There are the typical discussions about balance between expanding vs. deepening what we currently do. Fair arguments on both sides of the discussion. The company tends to be conservative. Unclear decision making can lead to confusion across the company. Some decisions are made by corporate leaders who don't understand the day to day realties. Needs of the company have outgrown some functional leaders. These issues are...
Sometimes the answer to the question “What is telemedicine?” is simply mobile medicine. It doesn’t require a heavy desktop computer or a lot of equipment. Activities that used to happen only in person are now easy to do on a smartphone. Modern consumers are accustomed to downloading apps and using their smartphones for simple transactions. The same is true for doctor visits. For example, with MDLIVE the patient simply opens the app and clicks to choose a doctor, with whom they can speak either by phone, instant message, or video.    
Real-time telemedicine (also called “synchronous telemedicine”) is probably what most people first think of when they hear “telemedicine.” Real-time telemedicine requires a live interaction between either a health professional and patient, or between health professionals, using audio and video communication. Think videochat. While most real-time telemedicine software is much more sophisticated than a simple videochat platform, the basic goal is to both see and talk to the patient from afar. This type of telemedicine is meant to offer a virtual alternative to the in-person doctor’s visit.
The benefits posed by telehealth challenge the normative means of healthcare delivery set in both legislation and practice. Therefore, the growing prominence of telehealth is starting to underscore the need for updated regulations, guidelines and legislation which reflect the current and future trends of healthcare practices.[2][23] Telehealth enables timely and flexible care to patients wherever they may be; although this is a benefit, it also poses threats to privacy, safety, medical licensing and reimbursement. When a clinician and patient are in different locations, it is difficult to determine which laws apply to the context.[41] Once healthcare crosses borders different state bodies are involved in order to regulate and maintain the level of care that is warranted to the patient or telehealth consumer. As it stands, telehealth is complex with many grey areas when put into practice especially as it crosses borders. This effectively limits the potential benefits of telehealth.[2][23]
Restrictive licensure laws in the United States require a practitioner to obtain a full license to deliver telemedicine care across state lines. Typically, states with restrictive licensure laws also have several exceptions (varying from state to state) that may release an out-of-state practitioner from the additional burden of obtaining such a license. A number of states require practitioners who seek compensation to frequently deliver interstate care to acquire a full license.
On July 7th, 2015, House representatives introduced the Medicare Telehealth Parity Act of 2015. If passed, the bill will expand what telemedicine services Medicare will cover and get rid of many limitations (like the requirements for what qualifies as an “originating site“). Legislation like this one could have a huge impact on coverage for remote patient monitoring and other telemedicine services delivered to the patient in their own home.
Telehealth is sometimes discussed interchangeably with telemedicine. The Health Resources and Services Administration distinguishes telehealth from telemedicine in its scope. According to them, telemedicine only describes remote clinical services; such as diagnosis and monitoring, while telehealth includes preventative, promotive and curative care delivery.[1] This includes the above-mentioned non-clinical applications like administration and provider education which make telehealth the preferred modern terminology.[2]
Online doctors are becoming a real thing across America, not just for those who are tech savvy, but for anyone. Although telemedicine was introduced in the United States in the 1960s, it didn’t become popular for the everyday man or women until this last decade. In the past, missing a prescription refill with your family doctor right before the weekend would mean going until Monday before you could even try to schedule an appointment. And even then, it might be days or weeks before you could get in to see the physician.
Internet Protocol (IP): The protocol for sending data from one computer over the Internet to another. Every computer that is on the Internet has one address at least that identifies it uniquely from all of the other computers that are on the Internet. Internet Protocol is a connectionless form of protocol, meaning there isn’t a connection that is established between the two points that are communicating with one another. A videoconferencing system’s IP address is its telephone number.
In Australia, during January 2014, Melbourne tech startup Small World Social collaborated with the Australian Breastfeeding Association to create the first hands-free breastfeeding Google Glass application for new mothers.[23] The application, named Google Glass Breastfeeding app trial, allows mothers to nurse their baby while viewing instructions about common breastfeeding issues (latching on, posture etc.) or call a lactation consultant via a secure Google Hangout,[24] who can view the issue through the mother's Google Glass camera.[25] The trial was successfully concluded in Melbourne in April 2014, and 100% of participants were breastfeeding confidently.[26][27] Small World Social[28] Breasfteeding Support Project.[29]
But it wasn’t until the early 20th century that the general population started to these technologies, and imagine they could be applied to the field of medicine. In 1925, a cover illustration of the Science and Invention magazine featured an odd invention by Dr. Hugo Gernsback, called the “teledactyl.” The imagined tool would use spindly robot fingers and radio technology to examine a patient from afar, and show the doctor a video feed of the patient. While this invention never got past the concept stage, it predicted the popular telemedicine definition we think of today – a remote video consult between doctor and patient.
Universal Service Administrative Company: Abbreviated as USAC, the Universal Service Administrative Company is responsible for administering USFs or Universal Service Funds to allow easy access to telecommunication services across the country. The Rural Health Care Division which is under USAC as well manages discount programs for telecommunications health care.
In 2009, the South Carolina Department of Mental Health established a partnership with the University of South Carolina School of Medicine and the South Carolina Hospital Association to form a statewide telepsychiatry program that provides access to psychiatrists 16 hours a day, 7 days a week, to treat patients with mental health issues who present at rural emergency departments in the network.[51]
To keep up with the rate that technology is progressing, the telemedicine will of course need to overcome other administrative barriers, such as restrictions placed on telemedicine practice by state legislation, state-specific licensing requirements by medical boards, and the reimbursement policies that affect whether doctors are reimbursed by payers and patients are not out-of-pocket. But with the projection that telemedicine will be a $36.3 billion industry by 2020, over 50 telehealth-related bills in the 113th Congress, and 75% of surveyed patients reporting interest in telemedicine, telemedicine’s future is bright and demand is likely to overcome these barriers.
While this definition sounds a lot like telemedicine, there is one distinct difference. Unlike telemedicine, telehealth also covers non-clinical events like administrative meetings, continuing medical education (CME), and physician training. Telehealth is not a specific service, but a collection of methods to improve patient care and education delivery.
There are many new medical tech terms being used today that the average patient may not be familiar with. For example, a common misunderstanding is that the terms telemedicine, telecare, and telehealth are interchangeable. The truth is that each of these terms refers to a different way of administering health care via existing technologies or a different area of medical technology. To clarify the subtle differences between these three terms, we have provided a detailed definition of each.
Patients who are planning to visit India for medical treatment can make the most of our Medical Tourism service. We are associated with the best hospitals and through our secure virtual platform we can assist you 8/7 between 11 AM to 7 PM and connect you with the best doctors online to resolve your medical concern. Get everything you need to know about various treatments before planning your travel. Receive pre and post travel assistance, plan the right treatment procedure, compare cost options and stay connected with your doctor online after returning to your home country.
Restrictive licensure laws in the United States require a practitioner to obtain a full license to deliver telemedicine care across state lines. Typically, states with restrictive licensure laws also have several exceptions (varying from state to state) that may release an out-of-state practitioner from the additional burden of obtaining such a license. A number of states require practitioners who seek compensation to frequently deliver interstate care to acquire a full license.
Jay McGraw and Adam Jackson, both 35, are changing the way that people interact with their doctors. Along with Dr. Phil, who is McGraw’s father, they launched Doctor On Demand in 2013. The San-Francisco-based startup offers online video consultations with 1,400 credentialed physicians around the country. One million people have downloaded the app -- and it’s raised $74 million in VC funding to date.
Remote surgery or telesurgery is performance of surgical procedures where the surgeon is not physically in the same location as the patient, using a robotic teleoperator system controlled by the surgeon. The remote operator may give tactile feedback to the user. Remote surgery combines elements of robotics and high-speed data connections. A critical limiting factor is the speed, latency and reliability of the communication system between the surgeon and the patient, though trans-Atlantic surgeries have been demonstrated.
Dr. Bernstein has practiced medicine since 1990 and provided virtual care with our team since 2006. He received his medical degree from the University of North Carolina and completed a residency at Providence Family Practice in Seattle. He also holds a Master's Degree in Public Health from the University of Washington. Dr. Bernstein is dedicated to quality preventive medicine, public health promotion, and research. As Director of Clinical Quality, he manages the development and maintenance of the clinical standards of patient care, working with the development team to create new systems for measuring clinical delivery effectiveness. In his spare time, he is an avid cyclist and a soccer fan.
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