If the state decides to cover telemedicine, but does not cover certain practitioners/providers of telemedicine or its telemedicine coverage is limited to certain parts of the state, then the state is responsible for assuring access and covering face-to-face visits/examinations by these "recognized" practitioners/providers in those parts of the state where telemedicine is not available.
Telehealth has emerged as a critical tool in providing health care services. [1] The practice covers a broad range of medical technology and services that collectively define the discipline. Telehealth is especially beneficial for patients who live in rural communities and other remote areas where medical professionals use the Internet to gather and share information as well as monitor the health conditions of patients by using peripheral equipment and software such as video conferencing devices, store-and-forward imaging, and streaming media. The following information details important factors that are shaping this burgeoning field.
In many Walmart stores, retail consumers can walk up to a kiosk for a doctor consultation. The doctor is not physically present inside the store. Instead, the customer uses a touchscreen computer to type in their symptoms and enter a virtual waiting room. They are then connected by a video link to a doctor. This use-case is HIPAA-compliant because the video link is encrypted to protect patient health information.
In 2009, the South Carolina Department of Mental Health established a partnership with the University of South Carolina School of Medicine and the South Carolina Hospital Association to form a statewide telepsychiatry program that provides access to psychiatrists 16 hours a day, 7 days a week, to treat patients with mental health issues who present at rural emergency departments in the network.[51]
Once a medical history and symptoms are detailed, the patient is either then immediately connected to a clinician via video conferencing technology or gets an interactive call back from a physician or nurse. The provider that the patient speaks to may not be the patient's primary care physician, but instead a contracted clinician at a telemedicine network.
Traditional use of telehealth services has been for specialist treatment. However, there has been a paradigm shift and telehealth is no longer considered a specialist service.[15] This development has ensured that many access barriers are eliminated, as medical professionals are able to use wireless communication technologies to deliver health care.[16] This is evident in rural communities. For individuals living in rural communities, specialist care can be some distance away, particularly in the next major city. Telehealth eliminates this barrier, as health professionals are able to conduct a medical consultation through the use of wireless communication technologies. However, this process is dependent on both parties having Internet access.[16][17][18]

Doctor On Demand operates subject to state laws. As of August 2017, Doctor On Demand offers behavioral healthcare in all states where Mental Health services are available to Doctor On Demand’s patient population at large, and Medical care in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Doctor On Demand is not intended to replace an annual, in-person visit with a primary care physician.** Doctor On Demand physicians do not prescribe Controlled Substances, and may elect not to treat or prescribe other medications based on what is clinically appropriate.
Children under 3 with a fever need to be seen immediately by a doctor in an office based setting. Children under 12 with ear pain can be treated if the pain is due to a virus (e.g. Colds), allergies, or an external infection. If there is a high likelihood it is a bacterial inner infection that needs antibiotics, they should be seen immediately by a doctor in an office based setting.
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